white broom

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n white broom low European broom having trifoliate leaves and yellowish-white flowers
    • ***

Usage

In literature:

It was the time of reds and whites, for the glory of the broom had passed, except at great heights, and the wild roses were trooping in.
"Tommy and Grizel" by J.M. Barrie
Big Mary was sweeping the ward with a broom muffled in a white bag.
"Love Stories" by Mary Roberts Rinehart
The rain flew before her plying broom in a white foam.
"By the Light of the Soul" by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman
I can see the white goats climbing up and pulling at the broom-plants.
"Dr. Dumany's Wife" by Mór Jókai
Her head was tied in a white cloth, her sleeves were turned back, she had on an apron, and she held a broom.
"Aurora the Magnificent" by Gertrude Hall
Cytisus albus (White Broom), Cytisus scoparius (Yellow Broom), and its varieties.
"Trees and Shrubs for English Gardens" by Ernest Thomas Cook
How often have you ridden out to the White Stone on a broom?
"Klytia" by George Taylor
Around the corner have a ring of ghosts manufactured from brooms with sheets and white cowls.
"Suppers" by Paul Pierce
The floors in these thrifty homes were covered with white sand, on which quaint figures were sketched with a broom.
"The Story of American History" by Albert F. Blaisdell
She leaned on a broom, the brush part of which was also covered with white muslin.
"Nan Sherwood at Lakeview Hall" by Annie Roe Carr
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In poetry:

The white broom flatt'ring her flowers in calm June weather,
'O most sweet wear;
Forty-eight weeks of my life do none desire me,
Four am I fair,'
"A Song In Three Parts" by Jean Ingelow
Blossom of broom will never make bread,
Red rose leaves will never make wine;
Between her brows she is grown red,
That was full white in the fields by Tyne.
"The Sea-Swallows" by Algernon Charles Swinburne
There was a strangeness in the room,
And Something white and wavy
Was standing near me in the gloom -
I took it for the carpet-broom Left by that careless slavey.
"Phantasmagoria Canto I (The Trystyng )" by Lewis Carroll
I will make my kitchen, and you shall keep your room,
Where white flows the river and bright blows the broom,
And you shall wash your linen and keep your body white
In rainfall at morning and dewfall at night.
"I Will Make You Brooches" by Robert Louis Stevenson