velar

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • adj velar produced with the back of the tongue touching or near the soft palate (as `k' in `cat' and `g' in `gun' and `ng' in `sing')
    • adj velar of or relating to the velum
    • n velar a consonant produced with the back of the tongue touching or near the soft palate
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Velar (Phon) Having the place of articulation on the soft palate; guttural; as, the velar consonants, such as k and hard g.
    • Velar Of or pertaining to a velum; esp. Anat of or pertaining to the soft palate.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • velar Of or pertaining to a veil or velum; forming or formed into a velum; specifically, in philology, noting certain sounds, as those represented by the letters gw, kw, qu, produced by the aid of the veil of the palate, or soft palate.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Velar (philol.) denoting sounds (gw, kw, &c.) produced by the veil of the palate or soft palate
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
See Velum
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr. veile (Fr. voile)—L. velum, a curtain—vehĕre, to carry.

Usage

In literature:

We may further mention that the I. E. labialized velar gv is represented by b, e.g.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 5, Slice 5" by Various
Farther up, within the velar area, the rudiments of the cerebral nerve-ganglion ng are seen separating from the ectoderm.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 11, Slice 5" by Various
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In science:

One such example is #20: labial-velars implies no uvulars.4 It turns out that labial-velars are most common in Africa just north of the equator, which is also a place that has very few uvulars (there are a handful of other examples, mostly in Papua New Guinea).
A Bayesian Model for Discovering Typological Implications
Labial-velars and uvulars are rare consonants (order 100 languages).
A Bayesian Model for Discovering Typological Implications
Labial-velars are joined sounds like /kp/ and /gb/ (to English speakers, sounding like chicken noises); uvulars sounds are made in the back of the throat, like snoring.
A Bayesian Model for Discovering Typological Implications
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