tailboard

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n tailboard a gate at the rear of a vehicle; can be lowered for loading
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Tailboard The board at the rear end of a cart or wagon, which can be removed or let down, for convenience in loading or unloading.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n tailboard The board at the hinder end of a cart or wagon, which can be removed or let down for convenience in unloading.
    • n tailboard In a ship, the carved work between the cheeks, fastened to the knee of the head.
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Usage

In literature:

The goats were decorated with the Fourth of July buntings and the wagons had the tailboards out and were tipped up like circus chariots.
"The Bobbsey Twins in the Country" by Laura Lee Hope
She came to me out of the rolling dust of an emigrant wagon, behind whose tailboard she was gravely trotting.
"The Bell-Ringer of Angel's and Other Stories" by Bret Harte
Then, as the tailboard of the wagon swung past him, he reached out and grabbed it.
"Tom Swift and his Airship" by Victor Appleton
One man clung to the tailboard.
"Little Journeys To the Homes of the Great, Volume 3 (of 14)" by Elbert Hubbard
All those in teams whipped up, yelling like madmen, and those on foot grabbed on behind and clambered over tailboards.
"The Skipper and the Skipped" by Holman Day
She came to me out of the rolling dust of an emigrant wagon, behind whose tailboard she was gravely trotting.
"Short Stories of Various Types" by Various
The boys took their places firmly standing on the tailboards of the sleds that projected in the rear.
"Winter Adventures of Three Boys" by Egerton R. Young
Ike gave his head a jerk towards the cart, and I ran and looked over the tailboard, to see a heap of sacks and some straw, but no Shock.
"Brownsmith's Boy" by George Manville Fenn
Bruce sprang upon the tailboard to ride, the dogs chased the cow and calf to the crossing.
"Who Crosses Storm Mountain?" by Charles Egbert Craddock (AKA Mary Noailles Murfree)
He was a junk gentleman and had lost the tailboard out of his wagon and been strewing horseshoes all along the way.
"Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Volume 11 (of 14)" by Elbert Hubbard
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