serjeant-at-law

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n serjeant-at-law an English barrister of the highest rank
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Serjeant-at-law formerly in England the highest degree of barrister, once with exclusive audience in the Court of Common Pleas, their proper dress a violet-coloured robe with a scarlet hood, and a black coif, represented in modern times by a patch of silk at the top of the wig
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. sergent—L. serviens, -entis, pr.p. of servīre, to serve.

Usage

In literature:

JOHN BRADSHAW, serjeant-at-law, was appointed president.
"A Child's History of England" by Charles Dickens
CALLOT, coif worn on the wigs of our judges or serjeants-at-law (Gifford).
"Volpone; Or, The Fox" by Ben Jonson
CALLOT, coif worn on the wigs of our judges or serjeants-at-law (Gifford).
"The Alchemist" by Ben Jonson
CALLOT, coif worn on the wigs of our judges or serjeants-at-law (Gifford).
"The Poetaster" by Ben Jonson
CALLOT, coif worn on the wigs of our judges or serjeants-at-law (Gifford).
"Sejanus: His Fall" by Ben Jonson
CALLOT, coif worn on the wigs of our judges or serjeants-at-law (Gifford).
"Every Man In His Humor" by Ben Jonson
The serjeant-at-law completed his quotation.
"The Man Who Laughs" by Victor Hugo
Justices were chosen from the Serjeants at Law.
"Our Legal Heritage, 5th Ed." by S. A. Reilly
Widdrington, Knight, Serjeant-at-Law, to be one of the Lords Commissioners of the Great Seal.
"A Journal of the Swedish Embassy in the Years 1653 and 1654, Vol II." by Bulstrode Whitelocke
We will consider the Serjeant-at-Law in the first place in his academic character, in which he might rank as a B.C.L.
"The Customs of Old England" by F. J. Snell
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