senesce

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v senesce grow old or older "She aged gracefully","we age every day--what a depressing thought!","Young men senesce"
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Usage

In literature:

What two phenomena of senescence were more frequent?
"Ulysses" by James Joyce
By that sort of piety to which senescent female sinners everywhere and at all times devote themselves she secured new friends.
"Lucretia Borgia" by Ferdinand Gregorovius
The gardener slammed the door of the senescent truck with vehement lack of affection.
"Greener Than You Think" by Ward Moore
Whatever her charm, she was no longer in her first youth, and only unripe fruit could sting that senescent palate.
"Black Oxen" by Gertrude Franklin Horn Atherton
They have reached old age, senescence.
"Syndrome" by Thomas Hoover
It is usually an expression of premature senescence.
"Degeneracy" by Eugene S. Talbot
The process in which we now find James engaged is mental rather than senescent, but you would hardly guess it to look at him.
"The Whirligig of Time" by Wayland Wells Williams
Et ad curiam de Lyndon, in aduentu senescalli.
"Villainage in England" by Paul Vinogradoff
I constantly act as phlebotomist to the vanity of the young and to the anecdotage of the senile and senescent.
"The Journal of a Disappointed Man" by Wilhelm Nero Pilate Barbellion
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In poetry:

Senescence begins
And middle age ends
The day your descendents
Outnumber your friends.
"Crossing The Border" by Ogden Nash
If I, with too senescent air,
Invade your elder memory's pale,
You snub me with a pitying 'Where
Were you in the September Gale?'
"To Holmes: On His Seventy-Fifth Birthday" by James Russell Lowell

In news:

Physical Exercise Prevents Cellular Senescence in Circulating Leukocytes and in the Vessel Wall Werner et al.
It's the bruising that comes from a squash sitting on a hard countertop, she said, that speeds senescence.
The one on the right received the drug to eliminate senescent cells.
Young cells continuously split to keep body tissues and organs functioning properly, but they eventually stop dividing — a state called senescence — and are replaced by other cells.
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In science:

Here, we assume that nodes in depth h + 1 are senescent, i.e. do not split.
The Aldous-Shields model revisited (with application to cellular ageing)
The first mathematical model for cellular senescence was given in .
The Aldous-Shields model revisited (with application to cellular ageing)
If the length of a telomere of one chromosome falls below a threshold, a cell cannot replicate any more and becomes senescent.
The Aldous-Shields model revisited (with application to cellular ageing)
In somatic cells, an uncapped telomere cannot be transformed to the capped state any more leading to senescent cells; see the model of .
The Aldous-Shields model revisited (with application to cellular ageing)
Here, Z p (t) and Z s (t) is the number of proliferating and senescent cel ls at time t, respectively.
The Aldous-Shields model revisited (with application to cellular ageing)
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