poetry

Definitions

  • POETRY COMMISSION-AGENTS FINDING A BACKER
    POETRY COMMISSION-AGENTS FINDING A BACKER
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n poetry literature in metrical form
    • n poetry any communication resembling poetry in beauty or the evocation of feeling
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: The original title of the musical "Hello Dolly!" was "Dolly: A Damned Exasperating Woman." Why did they change it? The original had such music, poetry, and pizzazz.
    • Poetry Imaginative language or composition, whether expressed rhythmically or in prose. Specifically: Metrical composition; verse; rhyme; poems collectively; as, heroic poetry; dramatic poetry; lyric or Pindaric poetry. "The planetlike music of poetry .""She taketh most delight
      In music, instruments, and poetry ."
    • Poetry The art of apprehending and interpreting ideas by the faculty of imagination; the art of idealizing in thought and in expression. "For poetry is the blossom and the fragrance of all human knowledge, human thoughts, human passions, emotions, language."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n poetry That one of the fine arts which addresses itself to the feelings and the imagination by the instrumentality of musical and moving words; the art which has for its object the exciting of intellectual pleasure by means of vivid, imaginative, passionate, and inspiriting language, usually though not necessarily arranged in the form of measured verse or numbers.
    • n poetry An imaginative, artistic, and metrical collocation of words so marshaled and attuned as to excite or control the imagination and the emotions; the language of the imagination or emotions metrically expressed. In a wide sense poetry comprises whatever embodies the products of the imagination and fancy, and appeals to these powers in others, as well as to the finer emotions, the sense of ideal beauty, and the like. In this sense we speak of the poetry of motion.
    • n poetry Composition in verse; a metrical composition; verse; poems: as, heroic poetry; lyric or dramatic poetry; a collection of poetry.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Poetry the art of expressing in melodious words the thoughts which are the creations of feeling and imagination: utterance in song: metrical composition
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Quotations

  • Ralph Waldo Emerson
    Ralph%20Waldo%20Emerson
    “Our best history is still poetry.”
  • Marianne Moore
    Marianne Moore
    “Poetry is all nouns and verbs.”
  • W. Winter
    W. Winter
    “Poetry is the language of feeling.”
  • Source Unknown
    Source Unknown
    “Love is the poetry of the senses.”
  • Robert Frost
    Robert%20Frost
    “Poetry is a way of taking life by the throat.”
  • Robert Frost
    Robert%20Frost
    “Poetry is what is lost in translation.”

Idioms

Poetry in motion - Something that is poetry in motion is beautiful to watch.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OF. poeterie,. See Poet
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. poète—L. poeta—Gr. poiētēspoiein, to make.

Usage

In literature:

It is a better play than the fantasy, though the fantasy has moments of better poetry.
"William Shakespeare" by John Masefield
The poetry of the first half of Elizabeth's reign is as mediocre as the poetry of the last half of her reign is magnificent.
"A History of English Literature" by George Saintsbury
The predominant, but not exclusive, characteristic of Jewish poetry is its religious strain.
"Jewish Literature and Other Essays" by Gustav Karpeles
Agriculture and commerce nourished among them; nor were they negligent of rhetoric and poetry.
"Critical and Historical Essays, Volume III (of 3)" by Thomas Babington Macaulay
She did things, you know, and made charms, and talked poetry, and people were afraid of her.
"The Beth Book" by Sarah Grand
To accustom boys to read poetry and prose nearly at the same period, is advantageous.
"Practical Education, Volume II" by Maria Edgeworth
A deep vein of poetry, of sub-conscious celtic sadness, ran through them all.
"A Son of the Middle Border" by Hamlin Garland
Noel had a poetry stall, where you could pay twopence and get a piece of poetry and a sweet wrapped up in it.
"Oswald Bastable and Others" by Edith Nesbit
Greek in those days was not only the language of poetry and philosophy, but the language of polite society and commercial usage.
"Great Men and Famous Women, Vol. 7 of 8"
There was less poetry written in the age of Charles I., than in that which preceded it, and more poetry enacted.
"Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Volume 1, No. 3, August, 1850." by Various
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In poetry:

Dear Johnny, I return my thanks to you;
But more than thanks is your due
For publishing the scurrilous poetry about me
Leaving the Ancient City of Dundee.
"Lines in Reply to the Beautiful Poet Who Welcomed News of McGonagall's Departure from Dundee" by William Topaz McGonagall
An old ghost's thoughts are lightning,
To follow is to die;
Poetry and music I have banished,
But the stupidity
Of root, shoot, blossom or clay
Makes no demand.
"The Spirit Medium" by William Butler Yeats
Julia, if I chance to die
Ere I print my poetry,
I most humbly thee desire
To commit it to the fire:
Better 'twere my book were dead,
Than to live not perfected.
"His Request To Julia" by Robert Herrick
Thus, as I sit beside the murm'ring sea,
And o'er its darkness trace light's parting streak,
I feel, O Nature! that serenity
Which vainly poetry like mine can speak!
"Lines Written At Brighton" by Sir John Carr
Can I forget the sweet days that have been,
When poetry first began to warm my blood;
When from the hills of Gwent I saw the earth
Burned into two by Severn's silver flood:
"Days that have Been" by William H Davies
I suppose, when poetry comes down to facts,
When our souls are returned to the gods
And the spheres they belong in,
Here in the every-day where our acts
Rise up and judge us;
"Au Salon" by Ezra Pound

In news:

More poetry from The Atlantic Monthly.
Hinge Poem offers chance to go deep into poetry.
The Poetry of the Ordinary.
Did you find poetry along your path this weekend.
But he does write poetry.
Floyd snobs who've who've slept on "The Final Cut" are missing out on "The Gunner 's Dream," which is one of the greatest pieces of poetry ever written in British English vernacular.
Poetry's Ball Turret Gunner The Nation.
The first collection from O'Rourke—critic, Slate culture editor and poetry editor at the Paris Review— displays a playful, energetic intelligence, varied aesthetics and a welcome self-possession, along with the inevitable growing pains.
On teaching and translating poetry.
Robert Hass Discusses His Pulitzer Prize-Winning Poetry.
Essayist, translator, and activist on behalf of poetry, literacy, and the environment, the former United States Laureate is a poet of great clarity and force.
One night I was taken to a local university campus, where there was an evening of poetry and music.
Translating haiku seems like a natural fit for Robert Hass , a United States Poet Laureate (1995-97), and recipient of the 2007 National Book Award for poetry.
More on poets and poetry in Atlantic Unbound and The Atlantic Monthly.
Prose, Poetry, Politics by Harold Pinter Grove, 205 pp.
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In science:

In his spare time, Brian enjoys playing with his cat Cleopatra, drinking wine, listening to music, cooking, playing his guitar, reading poetry, visiting with friends, and sleeping.
Variational Principles in General Relativity
The modern idea of self-similarity is best described by the following quote from On Poetry: a Rhapsody by Jonathan Swift (1733)1: So, naturalists observe, a flea Has smaller fleas that on him prey; And these have smaller still to bite ’em, And so proceed ad infinitum.
Self-similarity and random walks
Even before 2000 years tamils had heroic poetry Purananuru (28th poem) about the war fare methods. In that poem mention was made about 8 types of disability.
Mathematical Analysis of the Problems faced by the People With Disabilities (PWDs)
In poetry I suppose the corresponding question would be, what makes recounting possible? The answer, if it were to be complete, would take us into the most abstract and subtle mathematical thought.
Numbers
Jourdain. [] Scott Buchanan, Poetry and mathematics, Midway Reprint, University of Chicago Press, , First edition, ; new introduction, . [] Stanley N.
Numbers
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