placebo effect

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n placebo effect any effect that seems to be a consequence of administering a placebo; the change is usually beneficial and is assumed result from the person's faith in the treatment or preconceptions about what the experimental drug was supposed to do; pharmacologists were the first to talk about placebo effects but now the idea has been generalized to many situations having nothing to do with drugs
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Usage

In literature:

We are interested in what makes the placebo act as effectively as the true medication.
"A Practical Guide to Self-Hypnosis" by Melvin Powers
My own opinion is, it's what real physicians call the 'placebo effect.
"Life Blood" by Thomas Hoover
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In news:

Placebo Effect Linked to Dopamine-Clearing Enzyme .
0 The placebo effect , generally thought of as a conscious process, may occur subconsciously as well.
Is there a placebo effect .
It's the placebo effect .
From performing acupuncture in a tiny Massachusetts clinic to directing the Program in Placebo Studies and Theraputic Encounters at Harvard, Ted Kaptchuk has worked to understand the placebo effect and its place in medicine.
The Dark Side of the Placebo Effect : When Intense Belief Kills.
A Little Placebo Effect For the Common Cold.
The placebo effect is the ability of a dummy pill or a faked treatment to make people feel better, just because they expect that it will.
They just call it the placebo effect , said R.
Allen Iverson, Kobe Bryant, and Basketball's Placebo Effect .
Eliot Spitzer and the Price- Placebo Effect .
Placebo effect is strongest for the kind, hopeful, straightforward .
Placebo effect at work, researchers who looked at data from nearly 18,000 patients found.
They conclude the pain relief is partly real -- not the placebo effect.
A look at the placebo effect from the doctor's perspective.
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In science:

For example, the trial used as an illustration by Skene and Wakefield (1990) showed that the variation of placebo response rates was of the same magnitute as the variation of the treatment effect.
Multi-center clinical trials: Randomization and ancillary statistics
We propose a Wald-type test procedure for the retention of effect hypothesis (RET), which assures that the test treatment maintains at least a proportion ∆ of reference treatment effect compared to placebo.
The assessment and planning of non-inferiority trials for retention of effect hypotheses - towards a general approach
H1 : θT − θP > ∆ · (θR − θP ), where θk ∈ Θ ⊆ R, k = T , R, P , is the parameter of interest, representing the efficacy of a treatment, and ∆ ∈ [0, ∞) a fixed constant expressing the amount of the active control effect relative to placebo, which should be retained.
The assessment and planning of non-inferiority trials for retention of effect hypotheses - towards a general approach
Rejecting H0 implies to claim that the test treatment achieves at least ∆ · 100% of the active control effect, at which both are compared relatively to placebo.
The assessment and planning of non-inferiority trials for retention of effect hypotheses - towards a general approach
H1 : θT > ∆ · θR + (1 − ∆) · θP illustrates that in this case the test treatment effect is greater than a convex combination of the reference and the placebo effect if 0 ≤ ∆ ≤ 1.
The assessment and planning of non-inferiority trials for retention of effect hypotheses - towards a general approach
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