phial

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n phial a small bottle that contains a drug (especially a sealed sterile container for injection by needle)
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Phial A glass vessel or bottle, especially a small bottle for medicines; a vial.
    • v. t Phial To put or keep in, or as in, a phial. "Its phial'd wrath may fate exhaust."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • phial See vial.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Phial fī′al a small glass vessel or bottle.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. fiole, L. phiala, a broad, flat, shallow cup or bowl, Gr. . cf. Vial
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. phiala—Gr. phialē, a vial.

Usage

In literature:

We shall now immerse the phial in a glass of hot water, and the motion of the liquid will be shown, by that which it communicates to the amber.
"Conversations on Chemistry, V. 1-2" by Jane Marcet
A small phial was on the floor.
"Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland Volume 17" by Alexander Leighton
The little phial appeared to have been filled with a sticky, yellowish substance, and the odor was not pleasant.
"The Boy Ranchers in Camp" by Willard F. Baker
Isolde takes it out of the coffer once more and holds it up for Brangaene to see well, the little deadly phial.
"The Wagnerian Romances" by Gertrude Hall
And now I will give you this precious phial.
"The Olive Fairy Book" by Various
And the little blue phial, with the yellow poison-label, gave up his deadly intention to her eyes.
"The Dop Doctor" by Clotilde Inez Mary Graves
I pocketed the razor and the empty sulfonal phial.
"The Big Bow Mystery" by I. Zangwill
I'll wager each of you finds a phial of Ayupee hidden among them somewhere.
"Cleek, the Master Detective" by Thomas W. Hanshew
They had a few biscuits, a small bottle of spirits, and a phial of oil.
"Travels in North America, From Modern Writers" by William Bingley
By the light of a smoky lamp the two women scrutinised the labels, sniffing the various phials and flasks.
"Messengers of Evil" by Pierre Souvestre
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In poetry:

"Oh, JANE," the worthy woman said,
"This mystic phial keep,
And rub its liquor in your head
Before you go to sleep.
"The Cunning Woman" by William Schwenck Gilbert
The headlights picked out single faces,
Militiamen, stretches of street.
The nurse with a smelling-salts phial
Was rocked to and fro on her seat.
"In Hospital" by Boris Pasternak
So there the nice old lady sat,
With phials and boxes all in a row;
She asked the young doctor what he was at,
To thump her and tumble her ruffles so.
"The Stethoscope Song. A Professional Ballad" by Oliver Wendell Holmes
"Behold then this phial, there is that within
Will quickly add one to the dead;
When the church clock strikes twelve 'twill be time to begin,
In an hour thy breath will have fled."
"Edmund And Anna" by Charlotte Dacre
Here--'tis a room where thought, assertive, saith
That there are weights exact to gauge her by,
That inane ether, only, rounds the sky.
And that in phials of glass men breed up death.
"The Rope-Maker" by Emile Verhaeren
And the malice of death. For the wicked card is dealt and
The sinister tall-hatted botanist stoops at the spring
With his insignificant phial and looses
The plague on the ignorant town.
"As We Like It" by W H Auden

In news:

1.2-Million Phiale Returned to Italy February 11, 2000.
The Phiale of Achyris May 1, 1998.
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In science:

The first application we shall make of the foregoing principles, will be to the theory of the Leyden phial.
An Essay on the Application of mathematical Analysis to the theories of Electricity and Magnetism
Then, if the interior of the first phial, be made to communicate with the prime conductor of an electrical machine, in a state of action, all the phials will receive a certain charge, and this mode of operating is called charging by cascade.
An Essay on the Application of mathematical Analysis to the theories of Electricity and Magnetism
But the first system of equations gives 0 = ̺s + ̺s , whatever whole number s may be, and the second line of that just exhibited is expressed by 0 = ̺s−1 + ̺s , hence by comparing these two last equations ̺s = ̺s−1 , which shows that every phial of the system is equally charged.
An Essay on the Application of mathematical Analysis to the theories of Electricity and Magnetism
We therefore see, that the total charge of all the phials is precisely the same, as that which one only would receive, if placed in communication with the same conductor, provided its exterior coating were connected with the earth.
An Essay on the Application of mathematical Analysis to the theories of Electricity and Magnetism
Hence this mode of charging, although it may save time, will never produce a greater accumulation of fluid, than would take place, if one phial only were employed.
An Essay on the Application of mathematical Analysis to the theories of Electricity and Magnetism
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