outhouse

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n outhouse a small outbuilding with a bench having holes through which a user can defecate
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: In Bexley, Ohio Ordinance number 223, of 09/09/19 prohibits the installation and usage of slot machines in outhouses.
    • outhouse A small building with one or more seats and a pit underneath, intended for use as a toilet; a privy.
    • outhouse A small house or building at a little distance from the main house; an outbuilding.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n outhouse A small house or building separate from the main house; an outbuilding; specifically, in law, under the definition of arson, a building contributory to habitation, separate from the main structure, and so by the common-law rules a parcel of the dwelling-house or not, according as it is within or without the curtilage. A rude structure —for example, a thatched pigsty—may be an outhouse, but it must be in some sense a complete building. Bishop.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Outhouse owt′hows a small building outside a dwelling-house.
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Usage

In literature:

It was a comfortable affair, containing two rooms and a small outhouse, plus a certain amount of rough furniture.
"Colorado Jim" by George Goodchild
These are generally sheds or outhouses which have been converted into cottages.
"The Toilers of the Field" by Richard Jefferies
Almshouses and neglected outhouses are not proper places for them.
"Scientific American Supplement, No. 488, May 9, 1885" by Various
Then the child lay in the outhouse alone.
"The Dop Doctor" by Clotilde Inez Mary Graves
There was an overflow, as you may imagine, which had to be lodged in the outhouses.
"Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, September 30, 1914" by Various
It is true that a Greek scholar lives in my summer-house, but that is very different from keeping a Greek in an outhouse.
"The Squirrel Inn" by Frank R. Stockton
It had a Sensitive-Plantish garden and a paved yard and outhouses.
"Oswald Bastable and Others" by Edith Nesbit
He didn't dare to go to their outhouse during daylight.
"Shaman" by Robert Shea
The dogs of the pack were sound asleep in the outhouse.
"Billy Topsail & Company" by Norman Duncan
The outhouses must be abandoned, and everything which is of consequence taken from them.
"The Pirate and The Three Cutters" by Frederick Marryat
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In poetry:

Oh the enemas of childhood,
reeking of outhouses and shame!
Yet you rock me in your arms
and whisper my nickname.
"Cripples And Other Stories" by Anne Sexton
But those are just two stories
and I have more to tell
from the outhouse, the greenhouse
where you draw me out of hell.
"Cripples And Other Stories" by Anne Sexton

In news:

Are you considering building an outhouse to improve functionality at the cabin.
Check out John Sylvestre's light and airy outhouse at his Minnesota cabin.
Outhouses need "urine diverters" to keep the waste from becoming too liquid.
Don't put your outhouse over your well…an ongoing rant.
Photos and a video previous outhouse races are also on the site.
Before the advent of indoor plumbing, of course, outhouses were commonplace.
INDEPENDENCE — The annual Mountain Foliage Festival features events you can see nowhere else, like outhouses on wheels racing down the street, a Potty Princess "beauty" pageant and a toilet paper toss.
There are some areas of the country where outhouses are no longer permitted, but still some where they are.
A series of races using "new" outhouses are on tap.
Tickets for Route 20 Outhouse 's all inclusive New Years Eve Party are now on sale.
Guests will also be able to take advantage of Route 20 Outhouse 's New Year's Eve dinner buffet and open bar.
I kid you not at Chiefs training camp this year, they're using an outhouse for more than relief.
Early one morning, while unloading some personal logs in the outhouse, a black bear mauled him and dragged him pantless into the woods.
Outhouses aren't out of bounds for artist.
Drinking wells and outhouses were often in very close proximity.
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