obscurantism

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n obscurantism a deliberate act intended to make something obscure
    • n obscurantism a policy of opposition to enlightenment or the spread of knowledge
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Obscurantism The system or the principles of the obscurants.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n obscurantism Opposition to the advancement and diffusion of knowledge; a tendency or desire to prevent inquiry or enlightenment; the principles or practices of obscurantists.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Obscurantism opposition to inquiry or reform
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.,—L. obscurus.

Usage

In literature:

The normal woman, in so far as she has any religion at all, moves irresistibly toward Catholicism, with its poetical obscurantism.
"In Defense of Women" by H. L. Mencken
Obscurantism is better than the light of incendiary torches.
"Under Western Eyes" by Joseph Conrad
The romantic attitude is indeed as much out of date as that of hypocritical and shamefaced obscurantism.
"Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 6 (of 6)" by Havelock Ellis
It is in itself an argument which has no necessary connexion with obscurantism.
"Outspoken Essays" by William Ralph Inge
They succeed, in spite of their obscurantism, because they do confess and meet man's central need, his need to be saved.
"Preaching and Paganism" by Albert Parker Fitch
Now we say advisedly "primitive gods," and this with no intention of obscurantism.
"Ancient Art and Ritual" by Jane Ellen Harrison
Rarely has a deadlier foe of priestly obscurantism and mediaeval mysteries worn the episcopal robes.
"Essays on Scandinavian Literature" by Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen
It may be an excuse for cruelty and obscurantism.
"The Complex Vision" by John Cowper Powys
Its greatest crime was obscurantism, which was war on knowledge and civilization.
"Folkways" by William Graham Sumner
Only in the vast obscurantism of London is there safety for these exiles.
"William Pitt and the Great War" by John Holland Rose
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