laudatory

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • adj laudatory full of or giving praise "a laudatory remark"
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • a Laudatory Of or pertaining praise, or to the expression of praise; as, laudatory verses; the laudatory powers of Dryden.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • laudatory Containing or expressing praise; praising highly; extolling.
    • n laudatory laudatories (-riz). That which contains or expresses praise.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • adj Laudatory containing praise: expressing praise
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L. laudatorius,: cf. OF. laudatoire,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. laudārelaus, laudis, praise.

Usage

In literature:

The Chinaman observing the laudatory character of epitaphs, suggests a plan by which flattery might be indulged, without sacrificing truth.
"History of English Humour, Vol. 2 (of 2)" by Alfred Guy Kingan L'Estrange
All the houses were ornamented with flags, festoons, busts, and laudatory inscriptions.
"Napoleon and the Queen of Prussia" by L. Mühlbach,
Were they not the patterns whom he should model himself after in the laudatory desire for self-improvement?
"Villa Elsa" by Stuart Henry
He said a great deal about me, to my disgust, though it was in very laudatory terms.
"The Letters of Cicero, Volume 1" by Marcus Tullius Cicero
I believe he said it in reply to something I may have said that was less laudatory.
"Letters of Edward FitzGerald to Fanny Kemble (1871-1883)" by Edward FitzGerald
His laudatory orations, on the other hand, are among his happiest efforts.
"Historical Sketches, Volume I (of 3)" by John Henry Newman
Their writings were commonly laudatory of the officials, even when most offensive to the colonists.
"The History of Tasmania , Volume II (of 2)" by John West
Among the laudatory verses which, as was usual, precede this work, there is one of a rare character: a congratulatory ode to the wife of the author.
"A Budget of Paradoxes, Volume I (of II)" by Augustus De Morgan
His death evoked estimates of his work and worth from high ecclesiastical sources, and much of this was of a laudatory nature.
"Journal of Jasper Danckaerts, 1679-1680" by Jasper Danckaerts
Her name was frequently introduced into conversation, and always in the most laudatory fashion.
"About Peggy Saville" by Mrs. G. de Horne Vaizey
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In news:

THERE is something inherently self-laudatory in the notion of businesspeople offering their wisdom in books about their own successes.
Both of the other newspapers in Haywood County have beat me to the punch, publishing glowing articles and laudatory editorials.
It isn't easy to write a laudatory essay on the UNHRC, but Eileen Donahoe manages to do it.
One is examining why the broadcaster decided to drop an investigation by its flagship Newsnight TV program into Savile shortly after his death and ran laudatory shows instead.
Ozzie Guillen was fired Tuesday after one year as manager of the last-place Miami Marlins, whose promising season began to derail in April when his laudatory comments about Fidel Castro caused a backlash.
MIAMI — Ozzie Guillen was fired Tuesday after one year as manager of the last-place Miami Marlins, whose promising season began to derail in April when his laudatory comments about Fidel Castro caused a backlash.
MIAMI (AP) — Ozzie Guillen has been fired after one year as manager of the last-place Miami Marlins, whose promising season began to derail in April when his laudatory comments about Fidel Castro caused a backlash.
They have all done laudatory work in their respective fields.
Proxies are enlisted to elucidate intentions, to describe sources and processes, to contextualize, to assess—naturally, in laudatory terms.
The nuggets included her surprisingly laudatory thoughts on Juno.
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In science:

For example, I came across the laudatory review by Frank (2006) of Martin A.
Astrophysics in 2006
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