isotonic

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • adj isotonic of or involving muscular contraction in which tension is constant while length changes
    • adj isotonic (used of solutions) having the same or equal osmotic pressure
    • adj isotonic of two or more muscles; having equal tension
    • adj isotonic relating to or characterized by the equal intervals of a musical scale "isotonic tuning"
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Isotonic (Physiology, Biochemistry) Having an osmotic pressure (tonicity) equal to that of a reference solution; -- of aqueous solutions. Contrasting with hypotonic and hypertonic. See hypertonic. "A knowledge of the colligative properties of solutions . . . is essential for one to understand fully the principles involved in rendering intravenous solutions isotonic with blood serum, or opthalmic solutions isotonic with lachrymal fluid. Solutions thus adjusted produce less shock and much less irritation than those which are hypotonic or hypertonic, and present-day practise recognizes the desirability of making the necessary adjustments whenever possible."
    • Isotonic Having or indicating, equal tones, or tension.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • isotonic Having or indicating equal tones.
    • isotonic In physical chemistry, possessing or producing equal osmotic pressures; especially, having salts dissolved in such proportion as to occasion no change of volume in red blood-corpuscles put in contact with the solution. Solutions having less concentration are called hypotonic; those having greater concentration, hypertonic. Poynting and. Thomson, Properties of Matter, p. 190.
    • isotonic Relating to isotonia.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • adj Isotonic ī-so-ton′ik having equal tones.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Iso-, + tonic,
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr. isos, equal, tonos, tone.

Usage

In literature:

Even {47} with isotonic solutions there will be a transfer of the solutes if these are of different chemical constitution.
"The Mechanism of Life" by Stéphane Leduc
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In news:

Isotoner Embroidered Ballerina Women's Slippers.
Has debuted a line of mattress toppers employing the Isotonic ErgoSmart trademarked technology.
The Olympics may inspire a record-breaking sales season for isotonic sports drinks in Atlanta this summer.
But Totes/Isotoner in Cincinnati thinks it has a new twist that could put more of them in the hands of a new generation.
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In science:

The isotonic pro jection, on the other hand, only lives on [0, ∞), and follows the steep increase of the real hazard to the right of 2.0, whereas it only locally corrects for the non-monotonicity.
Isotonic L_2-projection test for local monotonicity of a hazard
Figure 2: The real hazard function h(d) (black), the isotonic estimate ˆh(d) n of the hazard (red), and the Hall and van Keilegom estimate (blue) of the hazard (after calibration), for a sample of size n = 1000 from the distribution function F (d) .
Isotonic L_2-projection test for local monotonicity of a hazard
It is also of interest to compare the powers of the procedure, based on bootstrapping from a penalized and smoothed version of the hazard, with the powers obtained by just bootstrapping from the isotonic piecewise constant hazard estimate without any smoothing or penalizing.
Isotonic L_2-projection test for local monotonicity of a hazard
Figure 4: The estimated power curves for the family {F (d) : d ∈ [−1, 1]}, the isotonic test statistic Tn , defined by (2.5) (red), for the HvK test (blue), the Durot test (green), and the integral statistic version of this method (black).
Isotonic L_2-projection test for local monotonicity of a hazard
The general trend is that bootstrapping from the isotonic estimate itself gives more conservative critical values.
Isotonic L_2-projection test for local monotonicity of a hazard
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