hurricane

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n hurricane a severe tropical cyclone usually with heavy rains and winds moving a 73-136 knots (12 on the Beaufort scale)
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: In 10 minutes, a hurricane releases more energy than all the world'snuclear weapons combined.
    • n Hurricane A violent storm, characterized by extreme fury and sudden changes of the wind, and generally accompanied by rain, thunder, and lightning; -- especially prevalent in the East and West Indies. Also used figuratively. "Like the smoke in a hurricane whirl'd.""Each guilty thought to me is
      A dreadful hurricane ."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: In 1281, the Mongol army of Kublai Khan tried to invade Japan but were ravaged by a hurricane that destroyed their fleet
    • n hurricane A storm of the intensest severity; a cyclone. Hurricanes prevail chiefly in the East and West Indies, Mauritius, and Bourbon, and also in parts of China and the Chinese seas, where they are generally known as typhoons.
    • n hurricane Any violent tempest, or anything suggestive of one.
    • n hurricane In the eighteenth century, a social party; a rout; a drum.
    • n hurricane Synonyms Tempest, etc. See wind.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Names for Atlantic hurricanes can be only French, English, or Spanish.
    • n Hurricane hur′ri-kān a storm with extreme violence and sudden changes of the wind: a social party, a rout
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Quotations

  • Charles Caleb Colton
    Charles%20Caleb%20Colton
    “It is better to meet danger than to wait for it. He that is on a lee shore, and foresees a hurricane, stands out to sea and encounters a storm to avoid a shipwreck.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Sp. hurracan,; orig. a Carib word signifying, a high wind
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Sp. huracan, from Caribbean.

Usage

In literature:

After the hurricane had upset the wedding procession and carried off the princess, there arose a great tumult among those at court.
"Fairy Tales of the Slav Peasants and Herdsmen" by Alexander Chodsko
From there he had gone to the hurricane deck, in order to obtain a better view.
"Asiatic Breezes" by Oliver Optic
AN INDIAN OCEAN HURRICANE.
"The First Mate" by Harry Collingwood
The heavy pieces poured in a hurricane of fire.
"World's War Events, Vol. I" by Various
Sir Hyde Parker was lost in a hurricane, off Cuba, in the West Indies, in the year 1780.
"Thrilling Narratives of Mutiny, Murder and Piracy" by Anonymous
The hurricane, in its full intensity, lasted scarcely a minute.
"The Riflemen of the Ohio" by Joseph A. Altsheler
A whirlwind or hurricane in old writers.
"The Sailor's Word-Book" by William Henry Smyth
I had witnessed many a hurricane, but this fearful night exceeded all.
"Adventures of a Young Naturalist" by Lucien Biart
Blowing a hurricane 'tis!
"A Poor Man's House" by Stephen Sydney Reynolds
A hurricane came up from the orchestra, muffled, with beats of the big drum, like distant cannon.
"The Bill-Toppers" by Andre Castaigne
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In poetry:

Comes a night-dark stallion sired
Of the wind; a mare his mother
Whom Thessalian madness fired,
And the hurricane his brother.
"Pre-Ordination" by Madison Julius Cawein
Men said at vespers: "All is well!"
In one wild night the city fell;
Fell shrines of prayer and marts of gain
Before the fiery hurricane.
"Chicago" by John Greenleaf Whittier
Lord of the winds! I feel thee nigh,
I know thy breath in the burning sky!
And I wait, with a thrill in every vein,
For the coming of the hurricane!
"The Hurricane" by William Cullen Bryant
The Sea
I grieve with grief, at anguish I repine,
I dirge the keel the hurricane destroys:
For all the sorrows of the world are mine,
And all its joys.
""What ails you, Ocean, that nor near nor far"" by Alfred Austin
May this, our earth, begin a fiery feast!
May the thunder roll and glow!
The slaves will unite to fight the monstrous beast,
and hurricanes of souls will blow!
"A Youth" by Hristo Smirnenski
The startled waves leap over it; the storm
Smites it with all the scourges of the rain,
And steadily against its solid form
Press the great shoulders of the hurricane.
"By The Seaside : The Lighthouse" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

In news:

The US National Hurricane Center classifies hurricanes of Category 3 and above as major hurricanes.
Hurricane Charley (2004) is an example of a hurricane that brought Category 4 winds and impacts to coastal portions of Punta Gorda, Florida with Category 3 conditions experienced elsewhere in the city.
Hurricane Frances (2004) is an example of a hurricane that brought Category 2 winds and impacts to coastal portions of Port St Lucie, Florida with Category 1 conditions experienced elsewhere in the city.
Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center in Miami say the storm has grown into a Category 2 hurricane with top sustained winds at 105 mph.
A Hurricane Warning is issued if hurricane conditions are expected within 24 hours.
How Does Hurricane Sandy Compare to Hurricane Katrina.
Cangialosi said the hurricane center issues tropical storm watches and warnings and hurricane watches and warnings.
Tom Corbett announced Thursday that Pennsylvania homeowners will not have to pay hurricane deductibles on insurance claims stemming from damage caused by Hurricane Sandy.
The 2008 Atlantic hurricane season ended Sunday, marking the finish of one of the busiest and costliest hurricane seasons ever.
Hurricane Page Click to View Hurricane Page.
One of the must-do's every hurricane season is to prepare your hurricane kit.
Families and homes were devastated by the hurricane, leaving an entire community to recover in the aftermath of the vicious hurricane that hit the East coast last week.
Dannel P Malloy warned that Hurricane Sandy would be the greatest threat to life in Connecticut since the Great New England Hurricane of 1938.
The latest advisory on Hurricane Gustav now has it as a category 1 hurricane with winds sustained right around the center at 90 mph.
Hurricane Hunters are words used often during hurricane season.
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In science:

We see that for very short length-scales the model does badly (gives large forecast errors) presumably because not enough data is being used to be able to estimate the likely hurricane displacements in an accurate way.
Statistical modelling of tropical cyclone tracks: a semi-parametric model for the mean trajectory
Another way to say the same thing would be that the results are too affected by sampling error due to the effects of individual synoptic systems on the tracks of individual hurricanes.
Statistical modelling of tropical cyclone tracks: a semi-parametric model for the mean trajectory
This is presumably because there is a high density of data relative to the scales inherent in the shapes of the mean hurricane tracks, and so the variations in the shape of the mean hurricane tracks are well sampled.
Statistical modelling of tropical cyclone tracks: a semi-parametric model for the mean trajectory
It also suggests that there may be enough data to try and condition the shapes of the tracks on various covariates such as time of year, state of ENSO, state of NAO, intensity of the hurricane, etc.
Statistical modelling of tropical cyclone tracks: a semi-parametric model for the mean trajectory
Having derived the optimum length scale we can calculate the mean hurricane track displacements at any point in the basin, and can integrate along these displacements to form ‘mean hurricane tracks’.
Statistical modelling of tropical cyclone tracks: a semi-parametric model for the mean trajectory
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