heliograph

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v heliograph signal by means of a mirror and the using the sun's rays
    • n heliograph an apparatus for sending telegraphic messages by using a mirror to turn the sun's rays off and on
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Heliograph A picture taken by heliography; a photograph.
    • Heliograph An apparatus for telegraphing by means of the sun's rays. See Heliotrope, 3.
    • Heliograph An instrument for taking photographs of the sun.
    • Heliograph To photograph by sunlight.
    • Heliograph To telegraph, or signal, with a heliograph.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n heliograph A heliotrope; especially, a movable mirror used in signaling, surveying, etc., to flash a beam of light to a distance. In signaling the flashes are caused to follow one another in accordance with a signal-code. The mirror is mounted on a tripod, and has a part of the silvering removed from the back at the center. Two sights are provided in front with a screen. The tripod is set up, and a distant station is sighted through the hole in the mirror. The beam of light is then directed through both sights, and is seen at the distant station. By means of the Morse key, which causes the mirror to move through a limited arc, telegraphic signals can be flashed to a distance of many miles.
    • n heliograph In photography: An instrument for taking photographs of the sun.
    • n heliograph A picture taken by heliography; a photograph.
    • heliograph To communicate or signal by means of a heliograph.
    • heliograph To photograph.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Heliograph hē′li-o-graf an apparatus for signalling by means of the sun's rays: an engraving obtained by a process in which a specially prepared plate is acted on chemically by exposure to light: an apparatus for taking photographs of the sun
    • v.t Heliograph to signal to by means of the sun's rays
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Helio-, + -graph,

Usage

In literature:

For daytime signaling the United States Army favors the mirror or heliograph (sun-writing) system.
"Pluck on the Long Trail" by Edwin L. Sabin
Instantly, the ship shone like the polished mirror of a heliograph.
"Islands of Space" by John W Campbell
There was a flutter at the gate, and a pretty girl heliographed with her eyes that the parties of the other part were in sight.
"A Master Of Craft" by W. W. Jacobs
A waiter, seeing the sun flash on the circle of crystal, hurried over, firmly believing he had been heliographed.
"The Lure of the Mask" by Harold MacGrath
Kirke I suppose, had heliographed our arrival, and the Subadar and the native doctor met us.
"From Edinburgh to India & Burmah" by William G. Burn Murdoch
The marines get aviation, search-light, wireless, telegraphic, heliograph, and other signal drill.
"The U-boat hunters" by James B. Connolly
We bivouacked at Granaatz Plaatz farm that night, whence the heliograph winked the news of our engagement to our camp.
"The Relief of Mafeking" by Filson Young
Their breastplates take the sun like heliographs!
"Lorraine" by Robert W. Chambers
I had a heliograph post near the left-hand position, one near the centre and the one belonging to my staff on our extreme right.
"My Reminiscences of the Anglo-Boer War" by Ben Viljoen
It was just as if somebody was heliographing.
"A Patriotic Schoolgirl" by Angela Brazil
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In poetry:

And Love had made him very sage, as Nature made her fair;
So Cupid and Apollo linked , per heliograph, the pair.
At dawn, across the Hurrum Hills, he flashed her counsel wise —
At e'en, the dying sunset bore her husband's homilies.
"A Code of Morals" by Rudyard Kipling
Now Jones had left his new-wed bride to keep his house in order,
And hied away to the Hurrum Hills above the Afghan border,
To sit on a rock with a heliograph; but ere he left he taught
His wife the working of the Code that sets the miles at naught.
"A Code of Morals" by Rudyard Kipling

In science:

Bzowski et al. (2001, 2002) allowed the ionization rate to change as a continuous function of heliographic latitude, with the latitudinal pro file of the ioniz ation rate continuously changing with the phase of solar cycle.
Neutral interstellar hydrogen in the inner heliosphere under influence of wavelength-dependent solar radiation pressure
This latter assumption is based on out-of-ecliptic magnetic field measurements by Ulysses, which show that the radial heliospheric flux is essentially independent of heliographic latitude [Balogh et al., 1995; Smith et al., 2001].
A Non-potential Model for the Sun's Open Magnetic Flux
The 96-antenna heliograph will be constructed at this time.
The multifrequency Siberian Radioheliograph
The ability of the 10-antenna prototype (and the future heliograph) to study such events seems to be very important because generally believed that such events are manifestation of the primary energy releases.
The multifrequency Siberian Radioheliograph
The interest in lies in the study of the behavior of the solar quadrupole moment versus the radius and the heliographic latitudes.
New Concept for Testing General Relativity: The Laser Astrometric Test of Relativity (LATOR) Mission
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