gasometer

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n gasometer a large gas-tight spherical or cylindrical tank for holding gas to be used as fuel
    • n gasometer a meter for measuring the amount of gas flowing through a particular pipe
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n gasometer In chem.:
    • n gasometer An instrument or apparatus intended to measure, collect, preserve, or mix different gases.
    • n gasometer An instrument for measuring the quantity of gas employed in any chemical experiment.
    • n gasometer A reservoir or storehouse for gas, especially for the ordinary illuminating gas produced in gas-works, which supplies the various pipes employed in lighting streets and houses. The main part of the structure is a cylindrical gas-holder, formed of riveted sheet-iron plates braced internally, closed at the upper end, and resting at the open lower end in a masonry or brickwork water-tank of corresponding form, in which it rises or falls according to the amount of gas passing into or out of it. The holder (often more than 100 feet in diameter, and sometimes made in telescoping sections) is suspended from a heavy framework by chains passing over pulleys and terminating in partially counterbalancing weights, which aid in regulating the pressure. The name gas-holder is often used for the whole structure, as more appropriate than gasometer, since it is not in any sense a meter.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Gasometer an instrument for measuring gas: a place for holding gas
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A word invented by the Dutch chemist J. B. Van Helmont (1577-1644)—the form suggested by Gr. chaos.

Usage

In literature:

It was like an insurrection in a gasometer.
"A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, Complete" by Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens)
The miner could not live in a place filled with this injurious gas, any more than one could live in a gasometer full of common gas.
"The Underground City" by Jules Verne
The gasometer even must fall to pieces unless it is renewed; but the grass renews itself.
"Essays" by Alice Meynell
The Towers are not tall, but are low in proportion to their circumference, like a gasometer.
"Following the Equator, Complete" by Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens)
They were throwing pebbles on the top of the gasometer, and the grimy gas-man in change bade them desist.
"Stalky & Co." by Rudyard Kipling
As the wind pushes the balloon against the gasometers, it is necessary to steady it now and then, to avoid an accident at the start.
"Original Short Stories, Volume 4 (of 13)" by Guy de Maupassant
As the wind pushes the balloon against the gasometers, it is necessary to steady it now and then, to avoid an accident at the start.
"Maupassant Original Short Stories (180), Complete" by Guy de Maupassant
And meantime, all around, people will be dying for want of some of the air that he will have bottled up in his gasometers.
"The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists" by Robert Tressell
It was like an insurrection in a gasometer.
"A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, Part 4." by Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens)
That is a natural gasometer within the reach of all purses.
"The Adventures of a Special Correspondent" by Jules Verne
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In news:

The 43-meter sculpture "Rainforest tree" towers in the Gasometer in Oberhausen, Germany, a former gas tank now used as an exhibition space.
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