feat

Definitions

  • CIRCUS PROFESSIONALS PRACTISING A FEAT OF BALANCING
    CIRCUS PROFESSIONALS PRACTISING A FEAT OF BALANCING
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n feat a notable achievement "he performed a great feat","the book was her finest effort"
    • ***

Additional illustrations & photos:

THROUGH A PAPER BALLOON AT THE END OF A GREAT FEAT THROUGH A PAPER BALLOON AT THE END OF A GREAT FEAT

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: The Holland and Lincoln Tunnels under the Hudson River connecting New Jersey and New York are an engineering feat. The air circulators in the tunnels circulate fresh air completely every ninety seconds.
    • Feat A striking act of strength, skill, or cunning; a trick; as, feats of horsemanship, or of dexterity.
    • Feat An act; a deed; an exploit. "The warlike feats I have done."
    • a Feat Dexterous in movements or service; skillful; neat; nice; pretty. "Never master had a page . . . so feat .""And look how well my garments sit upon me
      Much feater than before."
    • v. t Feat To form; to fashion. "To the more mature,
      A glass that feated them."
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n feat A deed; especially, a noteworthy or extraordinary act or performance; an exploit: as, feats of arms; feats of horsemanship or of dexterity.
    • n feat Synonyms Deed, Feat, Exploit, Achievement. These words are arranged in the order of strength; deed, however, may have a much more elevated character than feat, and even surpass exploit. A deed may, on the other hand, be base or ignoble. It is, therefore, often accompanied by an adjective of quality. A feat is generally an act of remarkable skill or strength: as, the feats of a juggler, a ventriloquist, an athlete. An exploit is especially an act of boldness or bravery, with various degrees of mental power in working it out. An achievement is the result of large ability in planning, and diligence and boldness in executing. Feat, exploit, and achievement differ from act, action, and deed in that the first three always, and the last three only sometimes, represent something great.
    • feat To form; fashion; set an example to.
    • feat Neat; skilful; ingenious; deft; clever.
    • feat Large: as, a pretty feat parcel (a rather large quantity).
    • feat To make neat.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Feat fēt a deed manifesting extraordinary strength, skill, or courage
    • v.t Feat (Shak.) to fashion
    • adj Feat neat, deft
    • ***

Quotations

  • Amelia Earhart
    Amelia Earhart
    “Women must pay for everything. They do get more glory than men for comparable feats, But, they also get more notoriety when they crash.”
  • Henry Ford
    Henry%20Ford
    “A bore is a person who opens his mouth and puts his feats in it.”
  • Dag Hammarskjold
    Dag%20Hammarskjold
    “Life only demands from you the strength that you possess. Only one feat is possible; not to run away.”
  • Source Unknown
    Source Unknown
    “Triumphs without difficulties are empty. Indeed; it is difficulties that make the triumph. It is no feat to travel the smooth road.”
  • Robert Frost
    Robert%20Frost
    “An idea is a feat of association, and the height of it is a good metaphor.”
  • Frank Moore Colby
    Frank%20Moore%20Colby
    “One learns little more about a man from his feats of literary memory than from the feats of his alimentary canal.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. fet, OF. fet, fait, F. fait, factum, fr. L. facere, factum, to make or do. Cf. Fact Feasible Do

Usage

In literature:

Of course it was most unfortunate, but fate performs unfortunate feats sometimes.
"The Fifth Wheel" by Olive Higgins Prouty
He performed a more wonderful feat in fashioning iron breast-plates which would resist the impact of red-hot missiles.
"Jerome Cardan" by William George Waters
The great naval feat of this war was the daring attack Rooke made on Gibraltar in 1704 with the help of some very gallant Dutch.
"Flag and Fleet" by William Wood
The home of the mole is usually beneath a tree or hillock, and reminds one of a miniature city of tunnels and engineering feats.
"The Human Side of Animals" by Royal Dixon
Most of them had practised swimming, diving, and other feats, until they were adepts in these water-arts.
"The Bobbin Boy" by William M. Thayer
Not a few strange feats were gone through, which Scott thought were impossible for Satan himself to perform.
"The Mysteries of All Nations" by James Grant
Now, Andersen does all these things in print: a truly wonderful feat.
"Essays on Scandinavian Literature" by Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen
Successfully to eat a slice of bread and jam was a feat, and one requiring careful preparation.
"With Our Army in Palestine" by Antony Bluett
Never, however, indulge in heavy work or feats of strength.
"Base-Ball" by John M. Ward
Insensibly his feats had set them a-thinking.
"Tancred" by Benjamin Disraeli
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In poetry:

Quo' she, how greatly blest am I,
In such a Man of Might?
Who if such Feats could do To-day,
What may'nt I hope at Night?
"The Royal Chace" by Cornelius Arnold
Coridon waxte pall and leane
His younger heares torned hore;
Feates of armes, the horse and hauke
He left and used no more.
"The Faire Amarillis" by Edward Dyer
Who for their deeds and martiall feates,
As bookes done yett record,
Amongst all other nations
Wer feared through the world
"The Legend of King Arthur" by Thomas Percy
Where many a feat of glory
And deed of worth were done,
From the links of her broken story
I've saved to the world this one:
"The Painter Of Florence" by Ernest Jones
To valiant feats of arms renown'd
Shall earthly praise be giv'n;
But deeds of MERCY, mighty Chief,
Are register'd in HEAV'N !
"Lewin and Gynneth" by Mary Darby Robinson
The years will pass, you'll marry yet
And you'll forget this squalor.
To be a woman is a feat,
To drive men mad, that's valour.
"Confession" by Boris Pasternak

In news:

Mariners surprised by no-hit feat.
I sixties folk/blues revival… feat.
Mark ronson oh my god (feat.
Incongruity, Southernism , Feats of Strength, Art.
The feat made headlines--and history--but the idea never took off commercially.
Watch the video to see details of this amazing feat.
Skydiver's supersonic feat could influence spacesuit design, crew training.
Jesse Owens is destined to forever be known as the athlete whose feats at the 1936 Berlin Olympics threw a monkey wrench into Adolf Hitler's propaganda machinery.
But that feat, while historic, isn't enough to make him legendary.
Filmmaker Carl Colby creates a remarkable feat of personalized biography.
Trainer Aidan O'Brien said he is pleased with Camelot's preparations for the upcoming Ladbrokes St Leger (G1), in which a victory would mean a rare sweep of the English Triple Crown, a feat not accomplished in four decades since Nijinsky II.
If not for the scenery, then for the History or perhaps the sheer feat of engineering.
A magnificent, exhila rating feat is taking place at Lincoln Center.
Jamaica man's feat saves straphanger .
" Strike Up Your Matches" (Feat.
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In science:

The first criterion leads to an isotropic architecture that feat ures a con figuration where the tool forces and velocities are equal in all directions.
Architecture Optimization of a 3-DOF Translational Parallel Mechanism for Machining Applications, the Orthoglide
In achieving this feat, some extra input is needed from other well measured quantities.
CP asymmetry in $B^{+}\to K^+\pi^{0}$ and New Physics
The feat that this million years of evolution has achieved is not trivial.
To study the phenomenon of the Moravec's Paradox
Its occurrence is especially pronounced in the case of flux lifting, and it should perhaps be sobering that the other parts of the DG operator do not manage the same feat.
High-Order Discontinuous Galerkin Methods by GPU Metaprogramming
That we can compute reliably the thermodynamics for non-abelian fields with three colors is no mean feat.
Theory at Quark Matter '02
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