exuviate

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v exuviate cast off hair, skin, horn, or feathers "our dog sheds every Spring"
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • exuviate To molt; shed or cast some part, as skin, hair, feathers, teeth, or shell.
    • exuviate To shed, cast, or throw off, as an effete skin, shell, or other external covering.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.i Exuviate to lay aside an old covering or condition for a new one
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L., from exuĕre, to draw off.

Usage

In literature:

The most serious trial through which society can pass is encountered in the exuviation of its religious restraints.
"History of the Conflict Between Religion and Science" by John William Draper
In the poet's mind the fact has gone quite over into the new element of thought, and has lost all that is exuvial.
"Beacon Lights of History, Volume XIII" by John Lord
Society, in all its developments, undergoes the process of exuviation.
"Essays on Education and Kindred Subjects" by Herbert Spencer
During every successive exuviation in this embryo state, they assume more and more of their perfect and established form.
"Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 433" by Various
In the poet's mind, the fact has gone quite over into the new element of thought, and has lost all that is exuvial.
"English Critical Essays" by Various
From this rapid growth, repeated exuviations must be requisite.
"A Monograph on the Sub-class Cirripedia (Volume 1 of 2)" by Charles Darwin
His house was an exuvial museum.
"Dealings with the Dead, Volume I (of 2)" by A Sexton of the Old School
Society, in all its developments, undergoes the process of exuviation.
"Illustrations of Universal Progress" by Herbert Spencer
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In news:

Exuviance Daily Antioxidant Peel CA10 Giveaway Rules.
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