crevasse

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n crevasse a deep fissure
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Crevasse A breach in the levee or embankment of a river, caused by the pressure of the water, as on the lower Mississippi.
    • Crevasse A deep crevice or fissure, as in embankment; one of the clefts or fissure by which the mass of a glacier is divided.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n crevasse A fissure or crack: a term used by English writers in describing glaciers, to designate a rent or fissure in the ice, which may be of greater or less depth, and from an inch or two to many feet in width.
    • n crevasse In the United States, a breach in the embankment or levee of a river, occasioned by the pressure of water, as in the lower Mississippi.
    • crevasse To rend, as the surface of a glacier, with fissures and cracks.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Crevasse krev-as′ a crack or split, esp. applied to a cleft in a glacier:
    • v.t Crevasse to fissure with crevasses
    • n Crevasse krev-as′ (U.S.) a breach in a canal or river bank
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Quotations

  • Graham Greene
    Graham%20Greene
    “His hilarity was like a scream from a crevasse.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F. See Crevice
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.

Usage

In literature:

The open crevasses were not the dangerous ones; the whole glacier was crisscrossed by crevasses completely covered with snow.
"The Ascent of Denali (Mount McKinley)" by Hudson Stuck
Great crevasses opened from time to time in the hills.
"Complete Story of the San Francisco Horror" by Richard Linthicum
At a height of 19,000 feet we walked for some time on soft snow, which covered an ice-field with deep crevasses and cracks.
"An Explorer's Adventures in Tibet" by A. Henry Savage Landor
Once a giant, it is nothing but a baby now, but the ice is still blue and clear, and the crevasses many and deep.
"Alaska Days with John Muir" by Samual Hall Young
The husband, in crossing a glacier, falls into a crevasse.
"Materials and Methods of Fiction" by Clayton Hamilton
They were close to a dangerous crevasse.
"Under False Pretences" by Adeline Sergeant
Hundreds of feet below us glittered the deep crevasses of the glacier, in which the rays of the sun disported.
"Celebrated Women Travellers of the Nineteenth Century" by W. H. Davenport Adams
Crevasses opened, extending from the summit of the hill downward.
"Doubloons--and the Girl" by John Maxwell Forbes
There were great plains, and crevasses, and a rocky, lifeless look everywhere.
"An Empty Bottle" by Mari Wolf
One does not walk into a crevasse with one's eyes open.
"The Silent Barrier" by Louis Tracy
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In poetry:

Now harnessed together like so many--horses,
By bridges of snow they cross awful crevasses;
So frail are these bridges that they who go o'er 'em
Indulge in a perilous "Pons Asinorum."
"The Alpine Club Man" by E W Bowling
At noon unnumbered rills begin to spring
Beneath the burning sun, and all the walls
Of all the ocean-blue crevasses ring
With liquid lyrics of their waterfalls;
As if a poet's heart had felt the glow
Of sovereign love, and song began to flow.
"The Glacier" by Henry Van Dyke

In news:

I held tightly as my fingers grasped the tiny granite crevasse.
Plant explorers were forging into new botanical territories—inlets in South American waterways, crevasses in China's mountains—and returning with roses and fruits, orchids and lilies.
A shallow avalanche on Alaska's Mount McKinley may not have killed four Japanese climbers, but the slide pushed them into a crevasse more than 100 feet deep, the National Park Service said Sunday.
Low-lying parts of New Orleans, Jefferson Parish are inundated by Sauve crevasse .
Seattle man dies while after falling into Mount Rainier crevasse .
Low-lying parts of New Orleans, Jefferson Parish are inundated by Sauve crevasse.
Culver City man collapsed and fell into a crevasse while climbing over boulders.
Low-lying parts of New Orleans, Jefferson Parish are inundated by Sauve crevasse.
ANCHORAGE, Alaska — A shallow avalanche on Alaska's Mount McKinley may not have killed four Japanese climbers, but the slide pushed them into a crevasse more than 100 feet deep, the National Park Service said Sunday.
ANCHORAGE, Alaska – A shallow avalanche on Alaska's Mount McKinley may not have killed four Japanese climbers, but the slide pushed them into a crevasse more than 100 feet deep, the National Park Service said Sunday.
Ten minutes outside of Paris is what Aquinnah archaeologist Duncan Caldwell calls a "phantasmagoric landscape" of gnarled rock outcroppings and crevasses.
Beartown State Park is a labyrinth of sandstone pits and mossy crevasses.
KATMANDU, Nepal (AP) — A government official in Nepal says that a Sherpa who was guiding a group of climbers on an Everest expedition has fallen into a crevasse and died.
Crevasses, bendable ice affect stability of Antartica ice shelf.
University of Colorado researchers are reporting that gaping crevasses and bendable ice found in the largest remaining ice shelf on the Antarctica Peninsula make it more susceptible to collapse.
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In science:

Hills and crevasses represent old and young information.
Time walkers and spatial dynamics of ageing information
From now on, we call that any closed subset X of Σ × I satisfying the conditions (i)-(iii) in Theorem A is crevasse of Σ × I .
Geometric limits of quasi-Fuchsian groups
For any crevasse X , there exists a geometric limit G of an algebraical ly convergent sequence of quasi-Fuchsian representations such that H3 ∪ Ω(G)/G is homeomorphic to Σ × I \ X .
Geometric limits of quasi-Fuchsian groups
Let X be a crevasse, and let Gi (i = 1, 2) be geometric limits of algebraically convergent sequences of quasi-Fuchsian groups with homeomorphisms hi : H3/Gi −→ Σ × I \ X .
Geometric limits of quasi-Fuchsian groups
In Section 2, topological and geometrical properties of block complexes and crevasses are studied.
Geometric limits of quasi-Fuchsian groups
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