cabin

Definitions

  • A CABIN ON THE TRAIL
    A CABIN ON THE TRAIL
  • WordNet 3.6
    • v cabin confine to a small space, such as a cabin
    • n cabin the enclosed compartment of an aircraft or spacecraft where passengers are carried
    • n cabin small room on a ship or boat where people sleep
    • n cabin a small house built of wood; usually in a wooded area
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Additional illustrations & photos:

Cabin John Bridge Cabin John Bridge
Daniel Boone in his Cabin Daniel Boone in his Cabin

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Castaways Travel, a Houston-area travel agency, offers an all-nude flight to Cancun Mexico. Once the plane reaches cruising altitude, you are allowed to take off all your clothes and roam about the cabin
    • Cabin A cottage or small house; a hut. "A hunting cabin in the west."
    • Cabin A room in ship for officers or passengers.
    • Cabin A small room; an inclosed place. "So long in secret cabin there he held
      Her captive."
    • v. t Cabin To confine in, or as in, a cabin. "I am cabined , cribbed, confined, bound in
      To saucy doubts and fears."
    • v. i Cabin To live in, or as in, a cabin; to lodge. "I'll make you . . . cabin in a cave."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: Harriet Beecher Stowe's "Uncle Tom's Cabin" was published March 20, 1852. It was the first American novel to sell one million copies.
    • n cabin A hut; a cottage; a small house or habitation, especially one that is poorly constructed.
    • n cabin A small room; an inclosed place.
    • n cabin An apartment in a ship for officers or passengers. In passenger-steamers the cabin is divided into state-rooms, or the private rooms of the passengers, and an apartment (sometimes more than one) for the use of all, called the saloon, generally used as a dining-room. In an ordinary merchant vessel the cabin is the apartment occupied by the master of the vessel. In a man-of-war it is the apartment used by the commanding officer, or the officer commanding the squadron, the apartments of the other officers being called the ward-room and (of the petty officers) the steerage. In Great Britain the word cabin, when applied to the private apartment of an officer or a passenger, is synonymous with state-room as used in the United States.
    • n cabin Same as cabinet, 4.
    • cabin To confine as in a cabin.
    • cabin To live in a cabin; lodge.
    • n cabin In mining, a small room partitioued off inside the mine for the use of the mine officials.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: The full name of Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin is actually Uncle Tom's Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly.
    • n Cabin kab′in a hut or cottage: a small room, esp. in a ship, for officers or passengers—hence Cab′in-pass′enger, one paying for superior accommodation
    • v.t Cabin to shut up in a cabin
    • v.i Cabin to dwell in a cabin
    • ***

Quotations

  • Melville D. Landon
    Melville D. Landon
    “I wasn't born in a log cabin, but my family moved into one as soon as they could afford it.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OF. caban, fr. W. caban, booth, cabin, dim. of cab, cot, tent; or fr. F. cabane, cabine, LL. cabanna, perh. from the Celtic

Usage

In literature:

There was part of Number One boat, with a beaker o' water an' a ham from the cabin stores.
"Isle o' Dreams" by Frederick F. Moore
A motor boat cabin fitted up with such a "kitchenette" was indeed a novelty.
"The Motor Girls on Crystal Bay" by Margaret Penrose
But during the first weeks of the cruise, she was too much interested in the work on the cabin to consider other matters.
"All the Brothers Were Valiant" by Ben Ames Williams
Accommodations fitted in the cabins of merchantmen for sitting upon, and stowing cabin-stores in.
"The Sailor's Word-Book" by William Henry Smyth
Patty entered the cabin and a few minutes later the sound of voices reached her ears.
"The Gold Girl" by James B. Hendryx
The snow, fine and hard as granulated sugar, was piled high against the cabin.
"Panther Eye" by Roy J. Snell
By this time darkness had come on, and the cook, who was also the only cabin attendant, had switched on the electric lights in the snug cabin.
"Uncle Sam's Boys as Lieutenants" by H. Irving Hancock
Beyond the last cabin they entered a sylvan world all their own.
"Judith of the Cumberlands" by Alice MacGowan
It's the cabin of an old vessel that came ashore here in a southerly gale years ago.
"Jim Spurling, Fisherman" by Albert Walter Tolman
The tramp withdrew from the cabin and lay down under a tree, where he was soon fast asleep.
"A Cousin's Conspiracy" by Horatio Alger
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In poetry:

For a cabin in the north
Hemlock may be fine,
But the houses on this knoll
Were petrified pine.
"Stone Axe Ruins" by Norman MacLeod
Then I got a little cabin
A place to call my own —
And I felt as independent
As the queen upon her throne.
"Learning To Read" by Frances Ellen Watkins
Hang a vine by de chimney side,
An' one by de cabin do';
An' sing a song fu' de day dat died,
De day of long ergo.
"Long Ago" by Paul Laurence Dunbar
Mistus prayed up in the parlor,
That the Secesh all might win;
We were praying in the cabins,
Wanting freedom to begin.
"The Deliverance" by Frances Ellen Watkins
When the word ran through the village,
The colored folks are free —
In the kitchens and the cabins
We held a jubilee.
"The Deliverance" by Frances Ellen Watkins
Gently rocked by ocean-billows
And the tides of dreamy musing,
I lie quiet in the cabin,
In my dark berth in the comer.
"The North Sea -- First Cycle" by Heinrich Heine

In news:

Poster for an American stage production of Uncle Tom's Cabin, 1881.
Embraer Executive Jets president Ernest Edwards (left) was at Jet Expo to promote the company's large-cabin Lineage 1000.
Here's a recipe guaranteed to let you enjoy most of your day at the cabin not cooking.
My quick visit to the upper Arts Cabin at Government Camp paid off with a great story.
Abe Lincoln was born in a log cabin, but his son built himself a mansion.
The cabin was built in 1804 midway between the emerging settlements of Franklinton and Worthington.
Traumatized by a near-fatal attack by a mugger, journalist Kendra Taylor leaves Washington, DC, for the rustic cabin in Toms Brook, Va. That once belonged to husband Isaac's grandmother.
The examining room at the Cabin Creek Health Center is familiar ground for licensed practical nurse Becky Williams.
Amid a heaping pile of chicken fingers, French fries and barbecue sauce, the Beaver cabin campers anxiously discuss their afternoon activities.
Longing for a cabin in the woods, Bob and Anita Wagner, of Philadelphia, were drawn to Spafford, where they would build their log home, near Otisco Lake.
Briton Mark Wilkinson set out from Dorset's West Bay harbor in his inauspiciously named 16-foot cabin cruiser.
Couple tries scaled-back living in a one-room cabin off the grid.
Harrison and Tyler, as depicted by the Hard Cider and Log Cabin Almanac.
At least three structures have fallen in water, two cabins in Willow Creek, and one house Thursday in the Matanuska River.
When planes crash, cabin fires and toxic fumes often claim more lives than the impact itself.
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In science:

The AEC group has realised the entire elevation structure (receiver cabin and connection to BUS) in CFRP, while VertexRSI applies insulated steel for the cabin and Invar for the connection cone to the BUS.
Evaluation of the ALMA Prototype Antennas
In principle there should be little print-through structure in the difference maps, due to the fact that the BUS design is more homogeneous, being all CFRP, and it should have a continuous transfer of forces to the cabin, which is also the same material.
Evaluation of the ALMA Prototype Antennas
Using a set of 10 seismic accelerometers, installed on the antenna back-up structure (BUS), subreflector support structure (apex), and receiver cabin, we have measured accelerations allowing determination of rigid body motion of the elevation structure, and a few loworder distortions of the BUS.
Study of the Dynamics of Large Reflector Antennas with Accelerometers
The BUS is made of low thermal–expansion CFRP–plated aluminum honeycomb; the quadripod is made of CFRP; the BUS support cone (on the focus cabin) is made of Invar.
Mechanical Measurements of the ALMA Prototype Antennas
As is the case with the X, Y axis, the axis X ′ and Y ′ are orthogonal and the corners of the cabin ⊥ A′B′C′ , ⊥ BCD, ⊥ D′E′O′ and ⊥ E′O′A′ are right angles.
The Twin Paradox Revisited and Reformulated -- On the Possibility of Detecting Absolute Motion
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