bathos

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n bathos a change from a serious subject to a disappointing one
    • n bathos triteness or triviality of style
    • n bathos insincere pathos
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Bathos bā"thŏs (Rhet) A ludicrous descent from the elevated to the low, in writing or speech; anticlimax.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n bathos Depth; lowest part or stage; bottom.
    • n bathos A ludicrous descent from the elevated to the commonplace or ridiculous in writing or speech; a sinking; anticlimax.
    • n bathos Synonyms Fustian, Turgidness, etc. See bombast.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Bathos bā′thos a ludicrous descent from the elevated to the mean in writing or speech
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Gr. ba`qos depth, fr. baqy`s deep
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr. bathos, depth, from bathys, deep.

Usage

In literature:

Considering the heights at which both words and music aimed, it is amazing that they did not fall into utter wreck and nauseating bathos.
"Contemporary American Composers" by Rupert Hughes
This scene ended, he seemed conscious of a bathos.
"The King's Mirror" by Anthony Hope
What sudden bathos in the sentence, you think!
"Ariadne Florentina" by John Ruskin
After that the play, I confess, was a drop into bathos.
"Appearances" by Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson
He had plunged in his nervousness to the lowermost bathos.
"Audrey Craven" by May Sinclair
That master of bathos, Martin Tupper, finds this idea very suitable.
"Flowers of Freethought" by George W. Foote
Who, on looking at a glorious landscape, does not feel the insufferable bathos of the descriptive enthusiast beside him?
"A Day's Ride A Life's Romance" by Charles James Lever
Bruce & Batho's dredger, when closed, is of hemispherical form, the bucket being composed of three or four blades.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 7" by Various
For Tacitus gave facilities for journalese, Juvenal for obscenity, and Pindar for colossal bathos.
"Years of Plenty" by Ivor Brown
Homely wit, bathos, and the grotesque he fixes as on a film, and makes no comment; fustian he parodies; affectation he feeds with banter.
"Francis Beaumont: Dramatist" by Charles Mills Gayley
***

In news:

Small Boy as Square Root Of Exponential Bathos.
***