anathematise

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v anathematise curse or declare to be evil or anathema or threaten with divine punishment
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t Anathematise to pronounce accursed
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
The classical Gr. anathēma meant a votive offering set up in a temple, ana, up, tithenai, to place; the anathĕma of the Septuagint and New Testament meant something specially devoted to evil, as in Rom. ix. 3.

Usage

In literature:

Well may mankind shriek, inarticulately anathematising as they can.
"The French Revolution" by Thomas Carlyle
When formally anathematised and excluded from the dominant Church the Nonconformists had neither a definite organisation nor a positive creed.
"Russia" by Donald Mackenzie Wallace
Sir Archie anathematised his frailties.
"Huntingtower" by John Buchan
Bill anathematised the dog, but the ludicrous bereavement he had sustained made him laugh, in spite of his teeth!
"The Sketches of Seymour (Illustrated), Part 3." by Robert Seymour
Bill anathematised the dog, but the ludicrous bereavement he had sustained made him laugh, in spite of his teeth!
"The Sketches of Seymour (Illustrated), Complete" by Robert Seymour
Mr. Camperdown anathematised the carelessness of everybody connected with Messrs. Garnett's establishment.
"The Eustace Diamonds" by Anthony Trollope
All drew back in horror, to let one so anathematised pass without contact.
"The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction" by Various
What an example for the man anathematised.
"Principles of Freedom" by Terence J. MacSwiney
He slept well, too, with never a thought of the Saturday express which he had lain awake on other nights to lament and anathematise.
"Truxton King" by George Barr McCutcheon
For my part, I utterly repudiate and anathematise the intruder.
"Lectures and Essays" by Thomas Henry Huxley
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