Unactiveness

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Unactiveness Inactivity.
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Usage

In literature:

So her impulse died in her, unacted on.
"Martin Pippin in the Apple Orchard" by Eleanor Farjeon
What association of ideas would ever operate, were that principle here totally unactive.
"An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals" by David Hume
How will they maintain the dominion of the sea, by lying unactive in our harbours?
"The Works of Samuel Johnson, Vol. 10." by Samuel Johnson
The unacted plays were not familiar to him.
"Eugene Field, A Study In Heredity And Contradictions" by Slason Thompson
At the present moment the cry of the unacted is unusually bitter and loud.
"Our Stage and Its Critics" by "E.F.S." of "The Westminster Gazette"
Not only is it absolutely unactable, but essentially undramatic in the conventional sense.
"Life of Robert Browning" by William Sharp
He perceived not, that his unactive virtue, the more it was extolled, the greater disregard was it exposed to.
"The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.I., Part D. From Elizabeth to James I." by David Hume
By way of enhancing the value of what were obviously stolen wares, it was falsely added that the piece was new and unacted.
"A Life of William Shakespeare with portraits and facsimiles" by Sidney Lee
It is this distinguishes Life and Consciousness from unactive unconscious Matter.
"Benjamin Franklin" by Frank Luther Mott
In the case of the unacted drama, however, there is no point of marked change.
"Tragedy" by Ashley H. Thorndike
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