Tuileries

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n Tuileries formal gardens next to the Louvre in Paris
    • n Tuileries palace and royal residence built for Catherine de Medicis in 1564 and burned down in 1871; all that remains today are the formal gardens
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Usage

In literature:

There is a famous horse-chesnut in the Tuileries which is named from {363} leafing so much earlier than the others.
"The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Vol. I." by Charles Darwin
That scene before the diplomatic circle at the Tuileries portended war.
"William Pitt and the Great War" by John Holland Rose
With streaming eyes, they saw her pass the gates of the Tuileries never to return.
"Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Vol. 3, July, 1851" by Various
We have here a vivid description of the taking of the Tuileries by the populace.
"Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 56, Number 347, September, 1844" by Various
He had been delighted also by the view of the long vistas from the Tuileries.
"On the Old Road Vol. 1 (of 2)" by John Ruskin
The Duke of Bordeaux is very well, and dines at the Tuileries to-morrow.
"The Life of Charles Dickens, Vol. I-III, Complete" by John Forster
To the declaration of the accused, who had been found secreted in the Tuileries, Fanfar replied with contempt.
"The Son of Monte Christo" by Jules Lermina
An Italian singer strove to reproduce in the Kremlin the evening entertainments of the Tuileries.
"The Two Great Retreats of History" by George Grote
Napoleon re-entered the Tuileries on the 20th, after a journey which he afterwards described as the happiest in his life.
"The Political History of England - Vol XI" by George Brodrick
Of course there will be no evening reception on the New Year at the Tuileries.
"Modern Women and What is Said of Them" by Anonymous
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In news:

Parisian concept store Colette will celebrate its 15th anniversary with afternoon festivities in and around Paris' Tuileries Garden on March 10 and 11.
The Empress Eugénie and the court of the Tuileries.
In "Tete-a-Tete, Tuileries Gardens," from 1910, Frank Wilcox shows a lively ability in watercolor while capturing an urban vignette of a man and woman speaking privately (but in the open).
An institution since 1898, the lavish, opulent Ritz—near the Louvre museum and Tuileries gardens—has maintained its stature as one of Paris 's leading hotels despite a plethora of trendy newcomers.
An institution since 1898, the lavish, opulent Ritz —near the Louvre museum and Tuileries gardens—has maintained its stature as one of Paris's leading hotels despite a plethora of trendy newcomers.
Le Moulin de la Tuilerie.
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