Toilet-cloth

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • ns Toilet-cloth a cover for a dressing-table
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. toilette, dim. of toile, cloth; cf. Toil (1).

Usage

In literature:

It was with difficulty that Toussaint had obtained permission to pack up a little linen and clothes and a few toilet articles.
"Les Misérables Complete in Five Volumes" by Victor Hugo
He hurriedly got into Rabbit's clothes, and just as he had completed his toilet, the wind blew very hard.
"Myths and Legends of the Sioux" by Marie L. McLaughlin
The toilet and wedding clothes!
"Condensed Novels" by Bret Harte
Cavalier put on his handsomest clothes, for the first time in his life perhaps taking trouble with his toilet.
"Massacres Of The South (1551-1815)" by Alexandre Dumas, Pere
Cavalier put on his handsomest clothes, for the first time in his life perhaps taking trouble with his toilet.
"Celebrated Crimes, Complete" by Alexandre Dumas, Pere
A maid servant came forward at once and brought heavy fur clothing for them and invited them into separate toilet rooms.
"The Land of the Changing Sun" by William N. Harben
Two other cloths, similarly wrapped, complete the simple, comfortable toilet.
"Russian Rambles" by Isabel F. Hapgood
No toilet was necessary, for both of them had lain down with their clothes on.
"Fighting for the Right" by Oliver Optic
Good for washing all kinds of clothing, fine flannels, silks, laces, and for toilet and bathing purposes.
"Continental Monthly , Vol IV, Issue VI, December 1863" by Various
Good for washing all kinds of clothing, fine flannels, silks, laces, and for toilet and bathing purposes.
"The Continental Monthly, Vol III, Issue VI, June, 1863" by Various
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In news:

"As housekeepers , we clean toilets, make beds, mop floors, do laundry, iron, mend their clothes and often we are asked to care for our employer's children, as well," she said, her voice breaking.
Making matters worse for Graterford Prison, the trash and debris often included full sheets, blankets, clothing, shoes, and plastics, which the prisoners stuffed into the toilets in their cells and flushed.
It was raining and Lombard complained that the cloth top leaked "like toilet paper, " Gooding said.
We use water to flush the toilet, shower, wash dishes and clothes, make ice, and to keep the interior and exterior clean — not to mention for drinking.
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