To cast in the teeth

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • To cast in the teeth to report reproachfully; to taunt or insult one with.
    • ***

Usage

In literature:

The sentence to which I refer, contained the words which cast in my teeth the excuses that I had made for Oscar's absence.
"Poor Miss Finch" by Wilkie Collins
There shall not be one left to cast it in the King's teeth and cry, 'Et tu, Carole!
"Count Hannibal A Romance of the Court of France" by Stanley J. Weyman
Sluggish indifference like this is not to be cast, in the teeth of those high-minded and liberal clergymen, the Chapter of Winchester.
"Punch - Volume 25 (Jul-Dec 1853)" by Various
There shall not be one left to cast it in the King's teeth and cry, 'Et tu, Carole!
"Historical Romances: Under the Red Robe, Count Hannibal, A Gentleman of France" by Stanley J. Weyman
These 'voices' of the doctor's creation were to be cast in my teeth again and again.
"My Experiences in a Lunatic Asylum" by Herman Charles Merivale
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In poetry:

Wipe, from thy well-kept register, away
All my iniquities recorded there,
And cast not in my teeth, on that dread day,
The keen reproaches I deserve to hear.
"A Morning Prayer, To Be Us'd After A Person Is Up, Wash'd, And Dress'd" by Rees Prichard
We, who in Youth, set white and careless teeth
In the Ripe Fruits of Pleasure while they last,
Later, creep back to gnaw the cast-off sheath,
And find there is no Rival like the Past.
"No Rival Like The Past" by Laurence Hope
Cean duv deelish, 'tis hard to pray
With breaking heart from day to day,
And no reply;
When the passionate challenge of sky is cast
In the teeth of the sea and an angry blast
Goes keening by.
"Cean Duv Deelish" by Dora Sigerson Shorter