Sea-liquor

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Sea-liquor brine
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. ; Dut. zee, Ger. see, Ice. sær, Dan. .

Usage

In literature:

Some sea god might have been stirring the furious liquor as a student stirs the joyous flames of punch in an orgy.
"A Woman of Thirty" by Honore de Balzac
It began to rain shortly, that cold, damp rain that seems to go with a rough sea just as naturally as red liquor goes with crime.
"McClure's Magazine December, 1895" by Edited by Ida M. Tarbell
Sea of Spirituous Liquors.
"Dr. Scudder's Tales for Little Readers, About the Heathen." by Dr. John Scudder
On the high seas, liquor is sold usually in original packages, which enormously increases the amount consumed.
"A New Conscience And An Ancient Evil" by Jane Addams
Free distribution of liquor by unscrupulous sea-captains did not mend {332} matters.
"Vikings of the Pacific" by Agnes C. Laut
On these occasions, it is needless to say, no liquor was found on board the Sea Fox.
"Pocket Island" by Charles Clark Munn
Their sole anxiety was to know what liquor the sea was going to bring them.
"The Fête At Coqueville 1907" by Emile Zola
Mair souls an' siller hae been drooned in that liquor than in the Dead Sea, whilk hauds Sodom and Gomorrah.
"Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland, Vol. XX" by Alexander Leighton
Rackham, after a cruise among the Caribbee islands, spent a Christmas on shore, and when the liquor was all gone put to sea.
"The Monarchs of the Main, Volume III (of 3)" by Walter Thornbury
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