Saucisse

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Saucisse (Fort) A fascine of more than ordinary length.
    • Saucisse (Mining or Gun) A long and slender pipe or bag, made of cloth well pitched, or of leather, filled with powder, and used to communicate fire to mines, caissons, bomb chests, etc.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n saucisse In fortification and artillery: A long pipe or bag, made of cloth well pitched, or of leather, filled with powder, and extending from the chamber of a mine to the entrance of the gallery. A long bundle of fagots or fascines for raising batteries and other purposes. To preserve the powder from dampness, it is generally placed in a wooden pipe. It serves to communicate fire to mines, caissons, bomb-chests, etc.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Saucisse sō-sēs′ a bag filled with powder for use in mines
    • Saucisse Also Saucisson′
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F., fr. saucisse, sausage. See Sausage

Usage

In literature:

SAUCISSE (LA PERE), an old peasant of Rognes, who owned an acre of land which he sold to Pere Fouan for an annuity of fifteen sous a day.
"A Zola Dictionary" by J. G. Patterson
Count, let me help you to a little more of these saucisses aux choux.
"Vivian Grey" by Earl of Beaconsfield, Benjamin Disraeli
As I came along, one of the men knocked the ashes of cigar upon a pile of small saucissions, and nodded a cheerful greeting.
"Vistas in Sicily" by Arthur Stanley Riggs
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In news:

Rue de Jean's offerings include Saucisse de Toulouse, lavender-cured foie gras, duck rillettes, house-smoked salmon, and country French pâté with pistachios.
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