Satin-damask

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Satin-damask a satin with an elaborate flower or arabesque pattern, sometimes raised in velvet pile
    • ***

Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr. satin (It. setino)—Low. L. setinus, adj.—L. seta, hair.

Usage

In literature:

He also spied among these some pieces of velvet, satin, and damask.
"Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete." by Francois Rabelais
They had silks, and satins, and damasks, and brocades, and high head-dresses, and all sorts of fine things.
"Grandfather's Chair" by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Shawls and ribosos of damask, laces, gowns of satin, of velvet.
"Ramona" by Helen Hunt Jackson
He also spied among these some pieces of velvet, satin, and damask.
"Gargantua and Pantagruel, Book V." by Francois Rabelais
Even the walls were covered with rich crimson damask-satin.
"Gordon Keith" by Thomas Nelson Page
What kind of a kitchen chair would one of these high-headed, damask satin parlor gentlemen make?
"Queer Stories for Boys and Girls" by Edward Eggleston
The drapery is of yellow satin damask.
"Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 443" by Various
French and English Cleaning, any Color or Fabric of Silk, Satin, or Damask.
"Mechanical Drawing Self-Taught" by Joshua Rose
The principal fabrics made of silk are: silk, satin, plush, chenille, crepe, crepon, gauze, damask, brocade, pongee, and ribbons.
"Textiles" by William H. Dooley
The foundation of these panels is of beautiful blue damask having applied designs cut from yellow satin.
"Quilts" by Marie D. Webster
***

In poetry:

Voluptuous, languid with perfumes,
As were the beauties that of old,
In damask satins, jeweled plumes,
With powdered gallants here that strolled.
"An Antique" by Madison Julius Cawein