Renaissance

Definitions

  • Renaissance Architecture
    Renaissance Architecture
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n Renaissance the revival of learning and culture
    • n Renaissance the period of European history at the close of the Middle Ages and the rise of the modern world; a cultural rebirth from the 14th through the middle of the 17th centuries
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Romans used to believe that walnuts could cure head ailments during the Renaissance, since their shape was similar to that of a brain
    • n Renaissance A new birth, or revival. "The Renaissance was rather the last stage of the Middle Ages, emerging from ecclesiastical and feudal despotism, developing what was original in mediæval ideas by the light of classic arts and letters."
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: The handkerchief had been used by the Romans, who ordinarily wore two handkerchiefs: one on the left wrist and one tucked in at the waist or around the neck. In the fifteenth century, the handkerchief was for a time allowed only to the nobility; special laws were made to enforce this. The classical heritage was rediscovered during the Renaissance.
    • n Renaissance A new birth; hence, the revival of anything which has long been in decay or desuetude. Specifically [capitalized], the movement of transition in Europe from the medieval to the modern world, and especially the time, spirit, and activity of the revival of classical arts and letters. The earliest traces and most characteristic development of this revival were in Italy, where Petrarch and the early humanists and artists of the fourteenth century may be regarded as its precursors. The movement was greatly stimulated by the influx of Byzantine scholars, who brought the literature of ancient Greece into Italy in the fifteenth century, especially after the taking of Constantinople by the Turks in 1453. The Italian Renaissance was at its height at the end of the fifteenth and in the early sixteenth century, as seen in the lives and works of such men as Lorenzo dei Medici, Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Machiavelli, Politian, Ariosto, Correggio, Titian, and Aldus Manutius. The Renaissance was aided everywhere by the spirit of discovery and exploration of the fifteenth century—the age which saw the invention of printing, the discovery of America, and the rounding of Africa. In Germany the Renaissance advanced about the same time with the Reformation (which commenced in 1517). In England the revival of learning was fostered by Erasmus, Colet, Grocyn, More, and their fellows, about 1500, and in France there was a brilliant artistic and literary development under Louis XII. (1498–1515) and Francis I. (1515–47). Also, in English form, renascence.
    • Renaissance Of or pertaining to the Renaissance; in the style of the Renaissance.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: During the Renaissance, fashionable aristocratic Italian women shaved their hair several inches back from their natural hairlines.
    • n Renaissance re-nā′sans a new birth: the period (in the 15th century) at which the revival of arts and letters took place, marking the transition from the Middle Ages to the modern world—hence 'Renaissance architecture,' &c
    • adj Renaissance relating to the foregoing
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Quotations

  • Harold Macmillan
    Harold%20Macmillan
    “Marxism is like a classical building that followed the Renaissance; beautiful in its way, but incapable of growth.”

Idioms

Renaissance man - A Renaissance man is a person who is talented in a number of different areas, especially when their talents include both the sciences and the arts.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
F., fr. renaître, to be born again. Cf. Renascence

Usage

In literature:

This was one of the principal characteristics of the spirit of the Renaissance.
"Erasmus and the Age of Reformation" by Johan Huizinga
But all the South was already full of the new youth of the Renaissance.
"A History of the United States" by Cecil Chesterton
The Renaissance never made any new ritual.
"Folkways" by William Graham Sumner
The French Renaissance takes inspiration from the Roman and Greek.
"Color Value" by C. R. Clifford
He had studied in Italy and was an enthusiastic student of the Italian Renaissance.
"Bell's Cathedrals: The Cathedral Church of St. Paul" by Arthur Dimock
This sort of sculpture seems to have been used by the Assyrians just as painting was used in Italy after the Renaissance.
"A History of Art for Beginners and Students" by Clara Erskine Clement
The finest lace of this variety was produced in the sixteenth century, the designs being bold, handsome, and purely Renaissance in type.
"Chats on Old Lace and Needlework" by Emily Leigh Lowes
The dawn of the Renaissance flushed Europe with the life of civilisation.
"The Tapestry Book" by Helen Churchill Candee
In order not to split up our subject we have wandered from the civilization of the Middle Ages into the early Renaissance.
"Belgium" by Emile Cammaerts
The Renaissance, however, needed another factor to complement it.
"A Tour of the Missions" by Augustus Hopkins Strong
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In poetry:

I've begun to forget
the names of those Renaissance masters.
I want to see
the black bird-and-flower watercolors
that slant-eyed Chinese painters drip
from their long thin bamboo brushes.
"Gioconda And Si-Ya-U" by Nazim Hikmet

In news:

Start-up central for newcomers in the food business—especially those in the low-income bracket— Renaissance Marin opened last month at 1115 Third Street in San Rafael.
With its sweeping, 360-degree view of Detroit from the 72nd floor of the Renaissance Center, Coach Insignia has always been a destination for celebratory meals.
Depending on your point of view, John Wesley Harding could be seen either as a renaissance man or a workaholic.
Vanilla Ice In Midst of Some Sort of Eco-Juggalo Renaissance, Might Renovate The Rock's House.
Studies in the Art of the Renaissance I.
Studies in the Art of the Renaissance II.
Studies in the Art of the Renaissance.
The young Renaissance woman breaks down the importance of branding.
Unfortunate-ly, this libertarian renaissance may be just as fleeting as the liberal-progressive resurgence of a few years ago.
As speculation continues to mount over a possible dismissal of charges in the Oakhill Renaissance case, it was still business as usual for indicted Mahoning County Commissioner John McNally Thursday.
LUCCA in September can make one forget the Renaissance ever happened.
WORLDLY GOODS A New History of the Renaissance.
The proposal, dubbed the Tri-Hamlet Renaissance Project, involved several resident-led working groups developing ideas for how best to revitalize the region.
There is a new 'Belle of the Ball' in Washington DC and it can be found in the city's historic hotel, The Mayflower Renaissance Hotel.
Explore an Urban Renaissance in Medellín .
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In science:

Recently, studies of the foundation of statistical mechanics are enjoying a renaissance.
Thermalization from a general canonical principle
Especially the work of Gasser and Leutwyler was instrumental in the renaissance of effective field theory methods in low-energy hadronic physics.
Chiral Perturbation Theory Beyond One Loop
The renaissance in hadron spectroscopy to which I referred earlier has been triggered by the discovery, or claimed discovery, of a number of unanticipated states.
Summary of Experimental Meson Physics
As I mentioned in the beginning, hadron spectroscopy has had a renaissance during the last five years.
Summary of Experimental Meson Physics
During the last years we have seen a veritable renaissance of hadron spectroscopy.
Summary of the Heavy Flavor Working Group
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