Poison-gland

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Poison-gland a gland which secretes poison
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.,—L. potio, a draught—potāre, to drink.

Usage

In literature:

The venom is delivered to the victim through the medium of a long fang which is connected with a gland in which the poison is stored.
"Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine" by George M. Gould
I crush in a few drops of water a joint of the tail taken from the front portion, far from the poison glands.
"The Life of the Fly" by J. Henri Fabre
We could no longer doubt that there was poison in the gland.
"From the Caves and Jungles of Hindostan" by Helena Pretrovna Blavatsky
Each is connected with the tube of the sac, C. This Is a reservoir of poison, and D is the gland by which it is secreted.
"Scientific American Supplement, Vol. XIX, No. 470, Jan. 3, 1885" by Various
Medicine is mostly poison and its effect is to shock the organs or glands to bring about reaction.
"Evening Round Up" by William Crosbie Hunter
Poison Gland of Spider (much magnified).
"Chatterbox, 1905." by Various
The last ring, the thirteenth, contains two poison glands and is furnished with a sting as fine as a needle.
"From Pole to Pole" by Sven Anders Hedin
No poison glands have ever been found in the mouth of these so-called monsters.
"Bloom of Cactus" by Robert Ames Bennet
Dufour's gland: that gland, in Hymenoptera, that secretes the alkaline portion of the poison carried by the sting.
"Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology" by John. B. Smith
This spur is connected with a gland, which resembles those of serpents, and may contain poison.
"Chatterbox, 1906" by Various
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