Paten

Definitions

  • Communion silver used in the Jamestown church after 1661. Both the chalice and paten were made in London, and donated to the church by Lt. Gov. Francis Morrison (or Moryson) in 1661. On both pieces is the legend: “Mixe not holy thinges with profane.”
    Communion silver used in the Jamestown church after 1661. Both the chalice and paten were made in London, and donated to the church by Lt. Gov. Francis Morrison (or Moryson) in 1661. On both pieces is the legend: “Mixe not holy thinges with profane.”
  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Paten A plate.
    • Paten (Eccl) The place on which the consecrated bread is placed in the Eucharist, or on which the host is placed during the Mass. It is usually small, and formed as to fit the chalice, or cup, as a cover.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n paten A broad shallow dish; a bowl.
    • n paten Eccles., a plate or flat dish; in the communion service of certain liturgical churches, the plate on which the consecrated bread is placed. In the primitive church the paten was an ordinary plate; but when wafers expressly prepared took the place of bread, the paten became an ecclesiastical vessel. It is wide and shallow, and is generally made of silver, but sometimes of glass, gold, alabaster, agate, or other hard material. In the Roman Catholic Church the paten must be of the same material as the accompanying chalice, of sonic hard metal, the inside of which is heavily glided, and, like the chalice, it must be consecrated by the bishop.
    • n paten A plate, as of metal.
    • n paten An obsolete form of patten.
    • n paten An iron plate used in making plate-armor.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Paten pat′en the plate for the bread in the Eucharist.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
LL. patina, patena, fr. L. patina, patena, a pan; cf. L. patere, to be open, E. patent, and Gr. pata`nh a kind of flat dish: cf. F. patène,. Cf. Patina
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.,—L. patina, a plate—Gr. patanē.

Usage

In literature:

They found the object beneath a triple linen cloth, like some consecrated paten.
"Les Misérables Complete in Five Volumes" by Victor Hugo
Into these gorgeous altar-cloths, or these delicate wrappings for chalice and paten, she stitched her heart.
"The History of David Grieve" by Mrs. Humphry Ward
There, too, is an Elizabethan chalice and paten of the sixteenth century.
"England of My Heart--Spring" by Edward Hutton
Major Rousy Paten was the Washington nigger 'ministrator.
"Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States" by Work Projects Administration
The communion plate includes a paten of about 1500.
"Somerset" by G.W. Wade and J.H. Wade
Psoralea patens, volume 2 page 8.
"Three Expeditions into the Interior of Eastern Australia, Vol 1 (of 2)" by Thomas Mitchell
On the top of the coffin was a chalice and paten of silver-gilt.
"The Cathedral Church of York" by A. Clutton-Brock
On the Feast of the Epiphany he added three golden chalices, weighing forty-two pounds, and a golden paten of twenty-two pounds' weight.
"Historical Tales, Vol. 6 (of 15)" by Charles Morris
Mr. Paten, Chief Butler.
"Christmas: Its Origin and Associations" by William Francis Dawson
There is also a paten of the latter date.
"Bell's Cathedrals: The Abbey Church of Tewkesbury" by H. J. L. J. Massé
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In poetry:

The Apostle takes the Cup of Wine,
The white Bread on the paten bright,
O Food of angels dear, divine!
The Lord of Life comes down in light,
And sweeter than the honeycomb
Rests in the heart that was His home.
"After Ascension" by Katharine Tynan

In news:

Deidre Ratliff of New Cambria helps her son Paten, 4, at a trout catch-and-release booth March 3 at the Missouri Deer Classic at the Boone County Fairgrounds , later renamed the Central Missouri Event Center, Home of the Boone County Fair.
Since the product was a flat sheet, 24 sq inches with four welded studs, manufacturing required sliding the pan across the lower (paten) electrode from one stud to the next, depositing copper on the part.
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