Paper-enamel

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Paper-enamel an enamel for cards and fine note-paper
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A shortened form of papyrus.

Usage

In literature:

The woodwork was enamelled white, and the wall paper was striped in white and silver.
"Laddie" by Gene Stratton Porter
He may conceive of an ideal insulating material to supersede glass, mica, paper, and enamel.
"The History of the Telephone" by Herbert N. Casson
The woodwork and the furniture were in white enamel; the paper had a pattern of wild-rose.
"In the Year of Jubilee" by George Gissing
It was a pretty room, papered in dainty blue and white, with a blue and white floor rug and white enameled furniture.
"Grace Harlowe's Return to Overton Campus" by Jessie Graham Flower
Benvenuto Cellini recommends a little paper sponge to be used in smoothing the face of enamels.
"Arts and Crafts in the Middle Ages" by Julia De Wolf Addison
Enameled walls are easily washed and are, therefore, preferable to wall paper or other dressings.
"The Mother and Her Child" by William S. Sadler
The landlords, no doubt, had too much regard for their white enamel and costly wall-papers to welcome tenants with large families.
"Betty Trevor" by Mrs. G. de Horne Vaizey
I've enamelled things before now, but never hung a paper.
"The Heart of Una Sackville" by Mrs. George de Horne Vaizey
The covers are printed in two colors from appropriate designs on a heavy coated enameled paper in assorted colors.
"The Young Oarsmen of Lakeview" by Ralph Bonehill
The wood-work was white-enameled; the walls covered with gray Japanese paper.
"The Trail of the Hawk" by Sinclair Lewis
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