Manciple

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Manciple A steward; a purveyor, particularly of a college or Inn of Court.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n manciple A steward; a caterer or purveyor, particularly of an English college or inn or court.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Manciple man′si-pl a steward: a purveyor, particularly of a college or an inn of court.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
From OF. mancipe, slave, servant (with l, inserted, as in participle,), fr. L. mancipium,. See Mancipate
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr.,—L. manceps, a purchaser—manus, hand, capĕre, take.

Usage

In literature:

He did as soon as Alice said that about whining and grizzling being below the dignity of a Manciple.
"The Wouldbegoods" by E. Nesbit
At this moment the door opened, and in came the manciple with the dinner paper, which Mr. Vincent had formally to run his eye over.
"Loss and Gain" by John Henry Newman
The Manciple coming upon the scene asked permission to eat with them, to which they agreed.
"The Canterbury Puzzles" by Henry Ernest Dudeney
Next follow the Friar and Monk; then the Tapiser, the Pardoner, and the Sompnour and Manciple.
"English Critical Essays" by Various
He did as soon as Alice said that about whining and grizzling being below the dignity of a Manciple.
"The Wouldbegoods" by E. Nesbit
Manciple, duties of the, 194.
"Nooks and Corners of English Life, Past and Present" by John Timbs
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