Expiator

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Expiator One who makes expiation or atonement.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n expiator One who expiates.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • Expiator one who expiates
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Quotations

  • Percy Bysshe Shelley
    Percy%20Bysshe%20Shelley
    “All of us, who are worth anything, spend our manhood in unlearning the follies, or expiating the mistakes of our youth.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
L
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
L. expiāre, -ātumex, inten., piāre, to appease, atone for.

Usage

In literature:

It was not long before he expiated his crime in death.
"Eastern Shame Girl" by Charles Georges Souli
By conversing with thy pious self, my painful curse has been expiated.
"The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 3 Pt. 2" by Translated by Kisari Mohan Ganguli
Would Father Crump speak of her as one in a state of inevitable ignorance to be expiated in the invisible world?
"A Reputed Changeling" by Charlotte M. Yonge
It was resolved also, that the prodigies should be expiated before the consuls set out from the city.
"History of Rome, Vol III" by Titus Livius
Such brutal murders as that of Chater in 1748, which crime was expiated at Chichester, were rare.
"Seaward Sussex" by Edric Holmes
Truly, all success in this world is a crime, and must be expiated.
"The Man Who Laughs" by Victor Hugo
As a rule, however, the recovery of caste by expiation is an easy matter.
"The World's Greatest Books, Vol XII." by Arthur Mee
O Lord, forgive us therefore our sins, and expiate our evil deeds from us, and make us to die with the righteous.
"Sacred Books of the East" by Various
Those who have disfigured life should, as an act of expiation, help to make life more beautiful for others.
"Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol 3" by Various
May you live happy, may the fearful suffering that you have caused me never be expiated.
"The Cross of Berny" by Emile de Girardin
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In poetry:

Yet why should not the culprit know
Wherefore he stands arraigned?
Why should the expiating blow
Fall on him unexplained?
"The Youthful Villager And The Hermit" by James Madison Bell
Then again the voice of vengeance
Pealed from Eachan's lips in hate:
"Childless and dishonoured villain,
Expiation comes too late.
"Loch Buy" by John Douglas Sutherland Campbell
My only guilt was that I saw thee,
Which I to pardon have no might,
Mine arm I'll stretch for ever vainly
To expiate my dream of light.
"So Fresh Thou Art .." by Mihai Eminescu
Then Justice grasped his gleaming sword,
All keenly drawn from point to hilt,
And waits the bidding of his Lord
To expiate the culprit's guilt.
"Banishment Of Man From The Garden Of The Lord" by James Madison Bell
To expiate is still my lot,--
And, like the Ancient Mariner,
To show to others how things are
And what I am, still helps me blot
A little from that crime's red scar,
That on my soul is branded hot.
"The Brothers" by Madison Julius Cawein
Has He no friends then, no father nor mother,
None to wipe the sweat away nor pity His fate?
There's a woman weeping and there's none to soothe her:
Child, it is well the seducer expiate
His crimes that are so great.
"Good Friday, A.D. 33" by Katharine Tynan

In news:

Fox Journalist Expiates John Mitchell .
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