Coper

Definitions

  • Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Coper kōp′ėr a ship employed in surreptitiously supplying strong drink to deep-sea fishermen—often spelt Cooper
    • v.i Coper to supply liquor in such a way
    • ***

Usage

In literature:

In my old clothes I must have appeared like some second-class bookie or seedy horse-coper.
"Mr. Standfast" by John Buchan
I abide here, following the Flower and drinking wine as an Afghan coper should.
"Kim" by Rudyard Kipling
And here is the carroty-poled urchin, George Coper, returning from work, and singing 'Home!
"Our Village" by Mary Russell Mitford
But what lunatic, barring yourself and the horse-coper, Elkin, is in love with Doris Martin?
"The Postmaster's Daughter" by Louis Tracy
The copers were undersold, and they found it best to take themselves off.
"A Dream of the North Sea" by James Runciman
Pine, in the character of a horse-coper, saw him out of the camp, and was staring after him when Chaldea, on the watch, touched his shoulder.
"Red Money" by Fergus Hume
Mr. Coper had other attractions for young and lusty fishermen.
"The Chequers" by James Runciman
Three days passed, and Charlie and Ping Wang were still on board the coper, no boat bound for Grimsby having been met.
"Chatterbox, 1905." by Various
There's the Coper alongside now; go, get another keg.
"The Young Trawler" by R.M. Ballantyne
At first Edward had better luck with his Lieutenant, a certain horse-coper or dealer.
"Red Cap Tales" by Samuel Rutherford Crockett
***

In poetry:

Where men saluted one the other,
Or as they passed or stood,
`Let us coöperate, my brother;
For God is very good.'
"Two Visions" by Alfred Austin
But oft exclaimed they one to other,
Or as they passed or stood,
`Let us coöperate, my brother;
For God is very good.'
"Two Visions" by Alfred Austin