Alkali soil

Definitions

  • Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Alkali soil Any one of various soils found in arid and semiarid regions, containing an unusual amount of soluble mineral salts which effloresce in the form of a powder or crust (usually white) in dry weather following rains or irrigation. The basis of these salts is mainly soda with a smaller amount of potash, and usually a little lime and magnesia. Two main classes of alkali are commonly distinguished: black alkali, which may be any alkaline carbonate, but which practically consists of sodium carbonate (sal soda), which is highly corrosive and destructive to vegetation; and white alkali, characterized by the presence of sodium sulphate (Glauber's salt), which is less injurious to vegetation. Black alkali is so called because water containing it dissolves humus, forming a dark-colored solution which, when it collects in puddles and evaporates, produces characteristic black spots.
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Usage

In literature:

On several acres, nothing would grow, on account of the alkali in the soil.
"Out of the Triangle" by Mary E. Bamford
It is by means of moisture that plants receive the necessary alkalies and salts from the soil.
"Familiar Letters of Chemistry" by Justus Liebig
In soils suffering from a deficiency of the available supply of phosphates and alkalies.
"Gold, Sport, And Coffee Planting In Mysore" by Robert H. Elliot
Sandy soils are rich in silica, but are generally poor in respect of phosphates and alkalies.
"The Culture of Vegetables and Flowers From Seeds and Roots, 16th Edition" by Sutton and Sons
The alkali plains, or deserts, as they are often erroneously called, are great stretches of adobe soil, known as "dobie" by the natives.
"Danger Signals" by John A. Hill and Jasper Ewing Brady
Further, this power of the soil was found not to extend to the whole salt of ammonia or potash, but only to the alkali itself.
"Talks on Manures" by Joseph Harris
But toward the centre the soil is bare clay, for when the water dried up so much alkali and salt were left that nothing could grow.
"The Western United States" by Harold Wellman Fairbanks
The so-called "alkali" of soils is not alkali at all, but is neutral soluble salts present in sufficient concentration to exert a toxic effect.
"The Chemistry of Plant Life" by Roscoe Wilfred Thatcher
The valley is here broad and the grass good, though the soil is considerably impregnated with alkali.
"Journal of a Trip to California" by Charles W. Smith
The alkali plains, or deserts, as they are often erroneously called, are great stretches of adobe soil, known as "dobie" by the natives.
"Stories of the Railroad" by John A. Hill
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