yolk

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n yolk nutritive material of an ovum stored for the nutrition of an embryo (especially the yellow mass of a bird or reptile egg)
    • n yolk the yellow spherical part of an egg that is surrounded by the albumen
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: A mother hen turns her egg approximately 50 times in a day. This is so the yolk does not stick to the shell
    • Yolk (Zoöl) An oily secretion which naturally covers the wool of sheep.
    • Yolk The yellow part of an egg; the vitellus.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: The largest chicken egg ever laid weighed a pound and had a double yolk and shell
    • n yolk The yellow and principal substance of an egg, as distinguished from the white; that protoplasmic content of the ovum of any animal which forms the embryo in germination, with or without some additional substance which serves to nourish the embryo during its formation, as distinguished from a mass of albumen which may surround it, and from the egg-pod or shell which incloses the whole; the vitellus, whether formative wholly or in part. In holoblastic ova, which are usually of minute or microscopic size, the whole content of the cellwall is yolk which undergoes complete segmentation, and is therefore formative or germinal vitellus, or morpholecithus. In large meroblastic eggs, however, such as those we eat of various birds and reptiles, the true germyolk forms only the nucleus and a relatively small part of the whole yolk-ball, which then consists mainly of food-yolk or tropholecithus. This is the yolk of ordinary language, forming a relatively large ball of usually yellow and minutely granular substance which floats in a mass of white or colorless albumen, inclosed in a delicate pellicle, or vitelline membrane, and is steadied or stayed in position by certain strands of stringy albumen forming the chalazæ. The quautity of germ-and of food-yolk relatively to each other and also to the amount of white varies much in different eggs, as does also the relative position of the two kinds of yolk. (See ectolecithal, centrolecithal.) In the largest eggs, as of birds, the great bulk results from the copiousness of the white and of the food-yolk, and the germ-yolk appears only at a point on the surface of the latter, where it forms the so-called tread or cicatricula. Some eggs contain more than one yolk, but this is rare and anomalous. See egg, ovum, and vitellus; also segmentation of the vitellus (under segmentation), and cuts under gastrulation.
    • n yolk The vitellus, a part of the seed of plants, so named from its supposed analogy with the yolk of an egg.
    • n yolk The greasy sebaceous secretion or unctuous substance from the skin of the sheep, which renders the fleece soft and pliable; wool-oil.
    • yolk See yoke.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Nine egg yolks have been found in one chicken egg
    • n Yolk yōk the yellow part of an egg: the vitellus of a seed: wool-oil
    • ***

Quotations

  • Rutherford Platt
    Rutherford Platt
    “We can see a thousand miracles around us every day. What is more supernatural than an egg yolk turning into a chicken?”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. yolke, yelke, ȝolke, ȝelke, AS. geoloca, geoleca, fr. geolu, yellow. See Yellow
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. geoloca, geolecageolo, yellow.

Usage

In literature:

From these regions the earth looks as small as the 'yolk in an egg.
"The Faust-Legend and Goethe's 'Faust'" by H. B. Cotterill
No champagne: yolk of egg and a little cream.
"Miss Mapp" by Edward Frederic Benson
His eggs hae a' twa yolks.
"The Proverbs of Scotland" by Alexander Hislop
At first the egg consists of the yolk alone.
"The Renewal of Life; How and When to Tell the Story to the Young" by Margaret Warner Morley
Separate the yolks very carefully, allowing not a speck of white to remain; remove also the germ which is attached to the yolk.
"Choice Cookery" by Catherine Owen
Just before serving add egg yolks, slightly beaten.
"The Suffrage Cook Book"
To 3 tablespoons of corn pulp add the well-beaten yolks of 3 eggs and a little salt.
"The Cookery Blue Book" by Society for Christian Work of the First Unitarian Church, San Francisco, California
Take the other pint of milk, the four yolks and four light tablespoonfuls of sugar, and place them over the fire, stirring constantly.
"Health on the Farm" by H. F. Harris
She scraped a pin-point of egg-yolk off a platter.
"Free Air" by Sinclair Lewis
In fact it really was the egg, or at least a portion of it, for it held a large part of what had been the yolk.
"Forest Neighbors" by William Davenport Hulbert
He kept breaking them until he found the yolks of a color to suit him.
"Turn About Eleanor" by Ethel M. Kelley
He's yeller as the yolk of a rotten aig.
"Rimrock Trail" by J. Allan Dunn
He cut off the top, and worked up the yolk with the handle of his spoon, mixing pepper and mustard.
"Ireland as It Is" by Robert John Buckley (AKA R.J.B.)
The yolk is slightly less than one-half water.
"The Scrap Book. Volume 1, No. 2" by Various
The yolk is albumin and fat.
"Applied Physiology" by Frank Overton
And I used two whites and a yolk in my pie-dough.
"Just Around the Corner" by Fannie Hurst
Ova large and with much yolk.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 5, Slice 7" by Various
Turn the yolk over the beaten white and cut and fold the white into the yolk mixture.
"Dietetics for Nurses" by Fairfax T. Proudfit
The fondant made of the yolk will not model quite so readily but coloring is unnecessary.
"Candy-Making Revolutionized" by Mary Elizabeth Hall
The fat is in the yolk, and gives it its yellow color.
"A Treatise on Physiology and Hygiene" by Joseph Chrisman Hutchison
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In poetry:

We make the yolk philosophy,
True beauty the albumen.
And then gum on a shell of form
To make the screed sound human.
"Poetic Eggs" by Ezra Pound
Alas! I cannot claim his high
Humanity;
Nor emulate his pungent, dry
Profanity;
Nor share his love of common folk
Who bear life's yolk.
"Ernie Pyle" by Robert W Service
One saw therein the life of man,
(Or so the poet found it,)
The yolk and white, conceive who can,
Were the glad earth, that, floating, span
In the glad heaven around it.
"Gold Egg: A Dream-Fantasy" by James Russell Lowell
They pulled me out from under that millin' mass o' legs,
And the fed me on hot whiskey and the yolks of ostrich eggs;
And as soon as I was able, I pulled freight for Cattle Land,
And the ostrich-punchin' business never gits my O. K. brand.
"The Ostrich-Punching of Arroyo Al" by Arthur Chapman

In news:

Milk 3 egg yolks 45 g.
In a heavy saucepan, whisk egg yolks and sugar for 1 minute.
Study comparing eating yolks to smoking has egg on its face.
Introducing the Vegan Egg Yolk .
San Diego-based restaurant chain Broken Yolk Café plans to open its sixth location in early December in Oceanside.
The Steak Crostini at Barsa Tapas, Lounge, and Bar is no yolk.
Slowly drizzle yolk mixture into chocolate mixture, whisking constantly.
The Broken Yolk on 16th and Wells on the Marquette Campus: This place gets a lot of student traffic.
After cracking open 13 double yolks in a row, she asked her husband to film as she went through the rest of the box she purchased from an Asda supermarket, a British subsidiary of Wal-Mart.
The Neighborhood Writing Alliance (NWA) is excited to announce "Shell and Yolk ," the Spring 2011 issue of the Journal of Ordinary Thought.
Hey, this is no yolk .
Sixth-graders use eggs for science, that's no yolk .
Pour however much of the white will fit in after the yolk.
I recently cracked open an egg , and it had three yolks in it.
We've reduced the fat to 2 tablespoons and cut out 3 egg yolks.
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