wood swallow

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n wood swallow Australasian and Asiatic bird related to the shrikes and resembling a swallow
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Wood swallow (Zoöl) any one of numerous species of Old World passerine birds belonging to the genus Artamus and allied genera of the family Artamidæ. They are common in the East Indies, Asia, and Australia. In form and habits they resemble swallows, but in structure they resemble shrikes. They are usually black above and white beneath.
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Usage

In literature:

A few score years ago, sick people were made to swallow burnt toads and powdered earthworms and the expressed juice of wood-lice.
"The Professor at the Breakfast Table" by Oliver Wendell Holmes (Sr.)
The whippoorwill walks as awkwardly as a swallow, which is as awkward as a man in a bag, and yet she manages to lead her young about the woods.
"Birds and Bees, Sharp Eyes and, Other Papers" by John Burroughs
All winter the swallow stayed there, and Thumbelina was often in the long passage, with her little torch of tinder-wood.
"Childhood's Favorites and Fairy Stories" by Various
Slowly the head of the line advances to the shadow of the wood, touches it and is swallowed.
"The Best Short Stories of 1915" by Various
The Wood Witch swallowed three times and up came Busujok, his horse, and his dogs.
"Roumanian Fairy Tales" by Various
The flaming wood swallowed them up; he stood and watched it.
"Wisdom, Wit, and Pathos of Ouida" by Ouida
You did swallow wood-lice, did you not?
"A Modern Tomboy" by L. T. Meade
Then the little wood swallowed her up.
"Mistress Anne" by Temple Bailey
Instantly, almost, the friendly woods growing down to the edge of the fill swallowed him up.
"The Escape of Mr. Trimm" by Irvin S. Cobb
All winter the swallow stayed there, and Thumbelina was often in the long passage, with her little torch of tinder-wood.
"Boys and Girls Bookshelf; a Practical Plan of Character Building, Volume I (of 17)" by Various
Railway under the ground, streets of wood, 'e swallow it all.
"Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 158, May 19, 1920" by Various
But for the dog, he could turn now, and the woods would swallow him up.
"Frank of Freedom Hill" by Samuel A. Derieux
At last the soft soil of the valley was reached again, and once more the deepening woods swallowed them up.
"The Golden Woman" by Ridgwell Cullum
A few moments, and hunted and hunters were swallowed up by the long dark shadows of the woods.
"Peggy Owen and Liberty" by Lucy Foster Madison
No doubt it had struck root when she had first beheld him, when he had swallowed in a breath all the wood, all the springtime.
"The German Classics, v. 20" by Various
Wood-Swallows and Swifts do not belong to the Swallow family.
"An Australian Bird Book" by John Albert Leach
The steady eyes of the Indian watched him until the woods had swallowed him up.
"The Way of the Strong" by Ridgwell Cullum
When the silence of the woods had swallowed up the last sound she set off at a run for home.
"The Trail of the Axe" by Ridgwell Cullum
And poor old Peter fell on his knees and prayed for their safety, till on a turn of the road the woods seemed to swallow them up.
"Born to Wander" by Gordon Stables
And poor old Peter fell on his knees and prayed for their safety, till on a turn of the road the woods seemed to swallow them up.
"Born to Wander" by Gordon Stables
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In poetry:

The lovely linnet now her song
Tunes sweetest in the wood;
The twittering swallow skims along
The azure liquid flood.
"Ode to Cynthia, on the Approach of Spring" by William Shenstone
But not the linnet's sweetest song
That ever fill'd the wood;
Or twittering swallow that along
The azure liquid flood
"Ode to Cynthia, on the Approach of Spring" by William Shenstone
The swallow round the gable led
Her fledgling brood, but far and near,
O'er wood and wold there seemed to spread
A dry and dreary atmosphere.
"Rhyme of my Playmate" by Alice Cary
A lyric there the redbird lifts,
While, twittering, the swallow drifts
'Neath wandering clouds of sleepy cream,—
In which the wind makes azure rifts,—
O'er dells where wood-doves dream.
"The Old" by Madison Julius Cawein
And he sprang to swallow her up alive;
But it chanced a woodman from the wood,
Hearing her shriek, rushed, with his knife,
And drenched the wolf in his own blood.
And in that way he saved the life
Of pretty little Red Riding-hood.
"Little Red Riding-Hood" by Clara Doty Bates

In news:

This small hotspot outside Everglades National Park is a great spot to find White-crowned Pigeon, Wood Stork, and Swallow-tailed Kite.
Harvest strawberries and miner's lettuce on a wild mountain forage on a Swallow Tail Tours day hike in the wooded foothills of Fraser Valley.
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