windage

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n windage the deflection of a projectile resulting from the effects of wind
    • n windage exposure to the wind (as the exposed part of a vessel's hull which is responsible for wind resistance)
    • n windage the space between the projectile of a smoothbore gun and the surface of the bore of the gun
    • n windage the retarding force of air friction on a moving object
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Windage (Gun) The difference between the diameter of the bore of a gun and that of the shot fired from it.
    • Windage The sudden compression of the air caused by a projectile in passing close to another body.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n windage The disturbance of the atmosphere by the movement of any object through it, as by that of a revolving fly-wheel or armature.
    • n windage The space intervening between the moving part of any mechanism and the inclosure within which it moves, as the air-gap of a dynamo.
    • n windage The air-friction of the moving parts of a machine as distinguished from the friction of the bearing surfaces.
    • n windage In gunnery:
    • n windage The difference allowed between the diameter of a projectile and that of the bore of the gun from which it is to be fired, in order to allow the escape of some part of the explosive gas, and to prevent too great friction.
    • n windage The rush or concussion of the air produced by the rapid passage of a shot.
    • n windage The influence of the wind in deflecting a missile, as a ball or an arrow, from its direct path, or aside from the point or object at which it is aimed; also, the amount or extent of such deflection.
    • n windage The play between the spindle of the De Bange gas-cheek and its cavity in the breech-screw: it is expressed in decimal parts of an inch, and is measured by the difference between the diameters of the spindle and its cavity.
    • n windage In surgery, same as wind-contusion.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • ns Windage the difference between the size of the bore of a gun and that of the ball or shell: the influence of the wind in deflecting a missile
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
From Wind air in motion
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. wind; Ice. vindr, Ger. wind, L. ventus, Gr. aētēs, Sans. vāta, wind.

Usage

In literature:

Consequently adequate allowance has to be made for windage, which is a very difficult factor to calculate from aloft.
"Aeroplanes and Dirigibles of War" by Frederick A. Talbot
The roots still held, while the tree had been shorn of its windage.
"South Sea Tales" by Jack London
The WIND GAUGE is adjusted by means of the windage screw at the right front end of the base of the sight.
"Manual for Noncommissioned Officers and Privates of Infantry of the" by War Department
They go forth clean and the windage is much reduced.
"The Son of Clemenceau" by Alexandre (fils) Dumas
The bristles are to be sheared so as to work easily and leave no windage.
"Ordnance Instructions for the United States Navy." by Bureau of Ordnance, USN
One point of windage moves the striking point of the bullet 4 inches for every 100 yards you are distant from the target.
"The Plattsburg Manual" by O.O. Ellis and E.B. Garey
Windage in the English gun of 1750 was about 20 percent greater than in French pieces.
"Artillery Through the Ages" by Albert Manucy
What allowance have you made for windage?
"Slain By The Doones" by R. D. Blackmore
The pellet should be of clay or any putty, rolled in the hand to easily pass through the barrel without too much windage.
"Practical Taxidermy" by Montagu Browne
Then look at the windage chart and see just how much windage you must take.
"Manual of Military Training" by James A. Moss
There was a quiet whir and a slight shifting of the rifle as the computer device allowed for correct elevation and windage.
"The Unprotected Species" by Melvin Sturgis
The =wind gauge= is adjusted by means of the windage screw at the right front end of the base of the sight.
"Manual for Noncommissioned Officers and Privates of Cavalry of the Army" by U. S. War Department
With lightning rapidity the trains passed each other and the "windage," to use a nautical term, nearly took my breath.
"Sawdust & Spangles" by W. C. Coup
But the greater weight and momentum of the English ball was counteracted by the excess of windage.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 12, Slice 6" by Various
How ardently he hoped that the bore was true and the windage not too great to spoil his aim!
"With Drake on the Spanish Main" by Herbert Strang
The elevation does not vary so much as the windage.
"Ladies in the Field"
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In news:

A bow net made of criss-crossed lacing will be equally effective but less obtrusive, and it will add less windage.
All that stuff on deck adds not only extra windage, but dangerous "hooks" that can snag your lines.
Dyno testing various oil pans and windage trays for horsepower.
He used the terms "windage" and "drafting.
There are several kinds of windage trays , but the basic concept is to reduce contact between oil and the crankshaft to minimize horsepower loss.
There are several kinds of windage trays , but the basic concept is to reduce contact betwe.
Turn Key Engine Supply Ls7 Windage Tray .
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