willow

Definitions

  • Willow Road
    Willow Road
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n willow a textile machine having a system of revolving spikes for opening and cleaning raw textile fibers
    • n willow any of numerous deciduous trees and shrubs of the genus Salix
    • ***

Additional illustrations & photos:

A kitten sits up on its haunches, looking up at a branch of pussy willow A kitten sits up on its haunches, looking up at a branch of pussy willow
Black Willow Black Willow
Almondleaf Willow Almondleaf Willow
Crack Willow. Brittle Willow Crack Willow. Brittle Willow
Weeping Willow. Napoleon's Willow Weeping Willow. Napoleon's Willow

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Aspirin went on sale as the first pharmaceutical drug in 1899, after Felix Hoffman, a German chemist at the drug company Bayer, successfully modified Salicylic Acid, a compound found in willow bark to produce Aspirin.
    • Willow (Textile Manuf) A machine in which cotton or wool is opened and cleansed by the action of long spikes projecting from a drum which revolves within a box studded with similar spikes; -- probably so called from having been originally a cylindrical cage made of willow rods, though some derive the term from winnow, as denoting the winnowing, or cleansing, action of the machine. Called also willy twilly twilly devil, and devil.
    • Willow (Bot) Any tree or shrub of the genus Salix, including many species, most of which are characterized often used as an emblem of sorrow, desolation, or desertion. “A wreath of willow to show my forsaken plight.” Sir W. Scott. Hence, a lover forsaken by, or having lost, the person beloved, is said to wear the willow. "And I must wear the willow garland
      For him that's dead or false to me."
    • v. t Willow To open and cleanse, as cotton, flax, or wool, by means of a willow. See Willow n., 2.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: Willow bark, which provides the salicylic acid from which aspirin was originally synthesized, has been used as a pain remedy ever since the Greeks discovered its therapeutic power nearly 2,500 years ago.
    • n willow Same as blackbutt.
    • n willow Same as coobah.
    • n willow A plant of the genus Salix, consisting of trees, shrubs, and rarely almost herbaceous plants. Of the many species a few are of decided economic worth as furnishing osiers (osier willow, crack willow, purple willow, while willow), or for their wood (crack willow, white willow), or for their bark, which in northern Europe is esteemed equal to oak-bark for tanning. Many are excellent for fixing loose sands, some serve for hedges, while several are highly ornamental. A few plants with some similarity to the willow have borrowed its name. See osier, sallow, and the phrases below.
    • n willow The wood of the willow; hence, in base-ball and cricket, the bat.
    • n willow See willow-herb.
    • n willow The variety Scouleriana of Salix flavescens, found on the western coast of North America, a small tree with the wood light, hard, strong, and tough.
    • n willow Same as bay willow .
    • n willow See willow-herb.
    • n willow Salix Sitchensis, a low much-branched tree of the Pacific coast from California northward.
    • willow Made of the wood of the willow; consisting of willow.
    • willow Of the color of the bark of young willow-wood; of a dull yellowish-green color.
    • willow To beat, as cotton, etc., with willow rods, in order to loosen it and eject the impurities; hence, to pick and clean, as any fibrous material; treat with the willow or willowing-machine.
    • n willow A power-machine for extracting dirt and foreign matter from hemp and flax, for cleaning cotton, and for tearing open and cleaning wool preparatory to Spinning. The machines used for these different materials vary in size, but are essentially alike, and consist of a revolving cylinder armed with spikes in a cylindrical casing also armed with spikes. A part of the casing forms a grid or sieve, through which the waste falls by gravity or is drawn by a suction blast In certain cotton manufactures it follows the opener, or is used in place of it, and is followed by the scutcher. Also called cotton-cleaning machine, devil, opening-machine, willower, willowing-machine, willow-machine, and willying-machine.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Willow wil′ō any tree or shrub of the genus Salix, having slender, pliant branches: the wood of the willow: a cricket-bat
    • v.t Willow to beat with willow rods, as in cleaning cotton, &c
    • ***

Quotations

  • Bruce Lee
    Bruce%20Lee
    “Notice that the stiffest tree is most easily cracked, while the bamboo or willow survives by bending with the wind.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. wilowe, wilwe, AS. wilig, welig,; akin to OD. wilge, D. wilg, LG. wilge,. Cf. Willy

Usage

In literature:

The opposite bank was heavily fringed with willows.
"The Huntress" by Hulbert Footner
A willow-clad island lay below, toward which the boat now was setting.
"The Young Alaskans on the Missouri" by Emerson Hough
While Fleetfoot was telling his story, Willow-grouse listened with sparkling eyes.
"The Later Cave-Men" by Katharine Elizabeth Dopp
Willow Wand was the daughter of old Chief Seafog.
"Fireside Stories for Girls in Their Teens" by Margaret White Eggleston
They all travelled together in silence until, after a mile and a half on the flat, the road sloped gradually toward a creek shadowed by willows.
"'Me-Smith'" by Caroline Lockhart
Willow-herb, tender and wistful, like a pink sunset cloud, was not slow to follow.
"The Wind in the Willows" by Kenneth Grahame
It was the prime of June and the winding willow-shaded Cherwell was in its beauty.
"The Invader" by Margaret L. Woods
Up near the willows at the gate she dimly descried a dark figure hastening along Champlain's Road.
"'Lizbeth of the Dale" by Marian Keith
Phoebe was down by the creek, washing clothes in the shade of a willow-clump.
"The Ranch at the Wolverine" by B. M. Bower
But besides Willow branches, Yew branches are sometimes used for the same purpose, and so we find Yews called Palms.
"The plant-lore and garden-craft of Shakespeare" by Henry Nicholson Ellacombe
Two willow branches shook, making a vanishing ripple on the smooth surface of the tree-tops.
"Red Men and White" by Owen Wister
Upon the willows in the midst thereof we hanged our harps.
"Getting Acquainted with the Trees" by J. Horace McFarland
Then she parted the willows and looked out over the rolling slopes and levels.
"Tharon of Lost Valley" by Vingie E. Roe
He had brought out from the chateau a kettle of freshly brewed willow-bark tea and a porcelain cup.
"Shaman" by Robert Shea
Traverse had never seen this girl, but his one great admiration was the beautiful Willow Heights and its worthy proprietor.
"Hidden Hand" by Emma Dorothy Eliza Nevitte Southworth
If the willow tree speaks, then Heaven wishes your union.
"The Chinese Fairy Book" by Various
Of vegetation there was nothing but scant grass and birch and willow growing like stunted shrubs close to the ground.
"Adventurers of the Far North" by Stephen Leacock
She stopped, withdrawing a little behind a willow, and studied his appearance.
"Shirley" by Charlotte Brontë
He jumped from the brush patch and ran for the willows of a little creek.
"Boys' Book of Frontier Fighters" by Edwin L. Sabin
One of these alleys led to the willow hedge.
"Tales from "Blackwood," Volume 6" by Various
***

In poetry:

It is as if the gloom of night
Had hid a summer's day,
And willows, sighing at their plight,
Bent low beside the way.
"To A Dead Friend" by Paul Laurence Dunbar
From the elm's leafy loftiness,
The poplar soaring fair,
Ash, beech, the willow's bending grace,
The woodland goddess there
"Immortal Eve - I" by Manmohan Ghose
"The willow wreath wear I, since my love did fleet;
O willow, willow, willow!
A garland for lovers forsaken most meet.
O willow, willow, willow!
O willow, willow, willow!
Sing, O the green willow shall be my garl-and."
"Willow, Willow, Willow" by Henry Morley
"O willow, willow, willow! the willow garl-and,
O willow, willow, willow!
A sign of her falseness before me doth stand:
O willow, willow, willow!
O willow, willow, willow!
Sing, O the green willow shall be my garl-and.
"Willow, Willow, Willow" by Henry Morley
"But what helps complaining? In vain I complain:
O willow, willow, willow!
I must patiently suffer her scorn and disdain.
O willow, willow, willow!
O willow, willow, willow!
Sing, O the green willow shall be my garl-and.
"Willow, Willow, Willow" by Henry Morley
"As then 'twas my comfort, it now is my grief;
O willow, willow, willow!
It now brings me anguish; then brought me relief.
O willow, willow, willow!
O willow, willow, willow!
Sing, O the green willow shall be my garl-and.
"Willow, Willow, Willow" by Henry Morley

In news:

Kyndel Mae Klug and Joshua Dane McCormack were married June 23, 2012 at The Grand Willow Inn in Mount Vernon.
Willow Smith, 9, is a "Trendsetter".
East side of York Road, Willow Grove.
Lowen Hankin purchased a section of the stores on Easton Road in downtown Willow Grove, including the two-story Ehrenpfort building (at left).
The Willow Grove Cab Co.
Willow Grove Naval Air Station.
5 IMAGES TAGGED WITH "WILLOW".
Wayne Eller, executive director of East Central Minnesota Habitat for Humanity, is walking from Cambridge to Duluth this week to raise money for a family who lost their Willow River home in the June floods.
Burial will be at Willow Creek Cemetery in Royal.
The final day of Willow Creek Winery's Homegrown Friday series is going to be wild.
Willow tree worrying Liverpool's Galeville neighborhood.
0It might just be a willow tree , but its a major worry for those who live close by.
Police find woman dead in Willow Tree apartment.
Willow Tree Florist and Landscaping, 7580 US Hwy 11, will hold a "Meet the Artists" night Thursday, Nov 8 from 5 to 7 p.m.
Hollerbach's Willow Tree Cafe's Eisbein Pork Hock.
***