widgeon

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n widgeon freshwater duck of Eurasia and northern Africa related to mallards and teals
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Widgeon (Zoöl) Any one of several species of fresh-water ducks, especially those belonging to the subgenus Mareca, of the genus Anas. The common European widgeon (Anas penelope) and the American widgeon (Anas Americana) are the most important species. The latter is called also baldhead baldpate baldface baldcrown smoking duck wheat duck, and whitebelly.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n widgeon A duck of the genus Mareca, belonging to the subfamily Anatinæ. The European widgeon is M. penelope; the American is a distinct species, M. americana; each is a common wild-fowl of its own country, of the migratory and other habits common to the Anatinæ, breeding mostly in high or even hyperborean regions, and flocking in more temperate latitudes during the winter. They are also known as baldpates, from the white on the top of the head, whistler or whistling duck, whew, whewer. whim, from their cries, and by many local names.
    • n widgeon By extension, some or any wild duck, except the mallard: usually with a qualifying term.
    • n widgeon The gad wall, Chaulelasmus streperus: more fully called gray widgeon. See cut under Chaulelasmus.
    • n widgeon The pintail, Dafila acuta: more fully, gray or kite-tailed widgeon, or sea-widgeon. See cut under Dafila.
    • n widgeon The wood-duck, Aix sponsa: more fully, wood-widgeon. See cut under wood-duck.
    • n widgeon The ruddy duck, Erismatura rubida. See cut under Erismatura.
    • n widgeon A fool: alluding to the supposed stupidity of the widgeon. Compare goose, gudgeon.
    • n widgeon A small teasing fly; a midge.
    • n widgeon The goldeneyed duck, Clangula glaucion.
    • n widgeon The male goosander, Mergus merganser.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Widgeon wij′on a genus of Ducks having the bill shorter than the head, the legs short, the feet rather small, the wings long and pointed, and the tail wedge-shaped: a fool.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Probably from an old French form of F. vigeon, vingeon, gingeon,; of uncertain origin; cf. L. vipio, -onis, a kind of small crane
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
O. Fr. vigeon—L. vipio, vipionis, a small crane.

Usage

In literature:

Soon a large flight came over, mixed up with mallard and widgeon.
"Marie" by H. Rider Haggard
Bolgodde is a very large lake of many miles in circumference, abounding with crocodiles, widgeon, teal, and ducks.
"The Rifle and The Hound in Ceylon" by Samuel White Baker
Allow me to make you acquainted with Mr. Widgeon of Hull.
"Mr. Crewe's Career, Complete" by Winston Churchill
Geese, ducks, teal, widgeons, shags, pelicans, pigeons, and others are procured in this way.
"Journals Of Expeditions Of Discovery Into Central Australia And Overland" by Edward John Eyre
Widgeon and Teal, To Dress.
"Enquire Within Upon Everything" by Anonymous
The widgeon is but a poor diver, while the canvas-back is one of the very best.
"The Hunters' Feast" by Mayne Reid
It happened that this was the nest of Old Mrs. Long Neck, the widgeon duck.
"Little White Fox and his Arctic Friends" by Roy J. Snell
Those widgeon, there, wouldn't do us much good.
"The Adventures of Bobby Orde" by Stewart Edward White
But the widgeon is ready for him.
"Popular Adventure Tales" by Mayne Reid
Old Widgeon answered this question.
"Prisoners of Poverty Abroad" by Helen Campbell
A wild duck or a widgeon will require twenty or twenty-five minutes roasting, according to the size.
"The Cook and Housekeeper's Complete and Universal Dictionary; Including a System of Modern Cookery, in all Its Various Branches," by Mary Eaton
Pheasant, pure of 181 Widgeon, to dress ib.
"The Lady's Own Cookery Book, and New Dinner-Table Directory;" by Charlotte Campbell Bury
Miss Widgeon," answered Maria, with strictly "company manners.
"Si Klegg, Book 5 (of 6) The Deacon's Adventures At Chattanooga In Caring For The Boys" by John McElroy
Once Dave fancied he heard Indians in pursuit and holding on to Widgeon's mane with one hand, drew up his gun with the other.
"Marching on Niagara" by Edward Stratemeyer
I hed all three for a change; sometimes a rabbit, sometimes a squrrel, with game to foller, sech as partridge, teal, an' widgeon.
"The Guerilla Chief" by Mayne Reid
Teal, and sometimes widgeon also, visit the place.
"Wild Life in a Southern County" by Richard Jefferies
Plovers, teal, or widgeons, come buy my pigeons.
"A History of the Cries of London" by Charles Hindley
They are in weight equal to a Widgeon, {429} though to appearance not so large.
"A Journey from Prince of Wales's Fort in Hudson's Bay to the Northern Ocean in the Years 1769, 1770, 1771, 1772" by Samuel Hearne
In a small pool of water at which they now arrived, they found a small teal or widgeon.
"The Life and Adventures of Bruce, the African Traveller" by Francis Head
They were not going at a higher speed than a flock of widgeon.
"The Secret Service Submarine" by Cyril Arthur Edward Ranger Gull
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In poetry:

When we packed each arm and shoulder,
Never deeming man a menace;
Surly birds were never bolder
Than our dainty doves of Venice:
Who would have believed a pigeon
Could become wild as a widgeon.
"The Pigeons Of St. Marks" by Robert W Service

In news:

Although it was a bit warm for the Southeast Texas duck season opener on Saturday, Nov 3, most hunters that had access to fresh water did very well with lots of limits that included teal, gadwall, pintails and widgeon.
Guide Dwayne Lowrey reports that he put his hunters on easy limits of teal, gadwall, widgeon and pintails while hunting a flooded field near Port Lavaca.
In addition to Pied-Billed Grebe, there are Scaups, Coots, Widgeons Buffleheads and even a Cormorant on the lake.
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