wattle

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v wattle interlace to form wattle
    • v wattle build of or with wattle
    • n wattle framework consisting of stakes interwoven with branches to form a fence
    • n wattle a fleshy wrinkled and often brightly colored fold of skin hanging from the neck or throat of certain birds (chickens and turkeys) or lizards
    • n wattle any of various Australasian trees yielding slender poles suitable for wattle
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Wattle (Zoöl) A naked fleshy, and usually wrinkled and highly colored, process of the skin hanging from the chin or throat of a bird or reptile.
    • Wattle A rod laid on a roof to support the thatch.
    • Wattle A twig or flexible rod; hence, a hurdle made of such rods. "And there he built with wattles from the marsh
      A little lonely church in days of yore."
    • Wattle (Zoöl) Barbel of a fish.
    • Wattle (Bot) In Australasia, any tree of the genus Acacia; -- so called from the wattles, or hurdles, which the early settlers made of the long, pliable branches or of the split stems of the slender species. The bark of such trees is also called wattle. See also Savanna wattle, under Savanna.
    • Wattle Material consisting of wattled twigs, withes, etc., used for walls, fences, and the like. "The pailsade of wattle ."
    • Wattle The astringent bark of several Australian trees of the genus Acacia, used in tanning; -- called also wattle bark.
    • Wattle To bind with twigs.
    • Wattle To form, by interweaving or platting twigs. "The folded flocks, penned in their wattled cotes."
    • Wattle To twist or interweave, one with another, as twigs; to form a network with; to plat; as, to wattle branches.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n wattle A framework made of interwoven rods or twigs; a hurdle. See hurdle.
    • n wattle A rod; a wand; a switch; a twig.
    • n wattle A basket; a bag or wallet.
    • n wattle In ornithology, a fleshy lobe hanging from the front of the head; specifically, such a lobe of the domestic hen, or a like formation of any bird. Wattles most properly so called are paired, as in the hen, but may be single, as the dewlap of the turkey. They are very various in size, shape, and color, but are usually pendent, and of some bright tint, as red, yellow, or blue. They occur in several different orders of birds, and among species whose near relatives are devoid of such appendages. Similar lobes or flaps on the auriculars are sometimes called ear-wattles, though more properly ear-lobes. See wattle-bird, wattle-crow, phrases under wattled, and cuts under Gallus and Rasores.
    • n wattle A flap of skin forming a sort of dewlap on each side of the neck of some domestic swine.
    • n wattle In ichthyology, a fleshy excrescence about the mouth; a barbel.
    • n wattle One of various Australian and Tasmanian acacias, valued to some extent for their wood and for their gum, but more for their bark, which is rich in tannin. For tanbark the most important species are Acacia decurrens, or (if it is distinct from this, as appears to be the case) A. mollissima, the common black wattle, also called green or feathered wattle, and A. pycnantha, the broad-leafed or golden wattle. The silver wattle, A. dealbata, closely allied to the black wattle, is distinguished by the ashen color of its young foliage, and is a taller tree of moister ground. Its bark is inferior, but is considerably used for lighter leathers. Other species yielding tan-bark are A. saligna (A. leiophylla), the blackwood or lightwood, A. Melanoxy-Ion, the native hickory (A. subporosa), A. pennineruis, etc. Several wattles yield a gum resembling gum arable. somewhat exported for use in cotton-printing as an adhesive, etc. The principal sources of this product are the black wattle, the broad-leafed wattle, and A. homolophylla.
    • n wattle In heraldry, a wattle or dewlap used in a bearing. Compare wattled.
    • wattle To bind, wall, fence, or otherwise fit with wattles.
    • wattle To form by interweaving twigs or branches: as, to wattle a fence.
    • wattle To interweave; interlace; form into basket-work or network.
    • wattle To switch; beat.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Wattle wot′l a twig or flexible rod: a hurdle: the fleshy excrescence under the throat of a cock or a turkey: one of various Australian acacias
    • v.t Wattle to bind with wattles or twigs: to form by plaiting twigs
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
AS. watel, watul, watol, hurdle, covering, wattle; cf. OE. watel, a bag. Cf. Wallet

Usage

In literature:

They are post-and-rail, wire, wattle, and stake.
"Brighter Britain! (Volume 1 of 2)" by William Delisle Hay
It was a hut built of clay and wattles.
"Boys and Girls Bookshelf (Vol 2 of 17)" by Various
The varieties of the wattle are especially beautiful.
"Six Letters From the Colonies" by Robert Seaton
He rubs his ears, and says his wattles are inflamed.
"Love and Lucy" by Maurice Henry Hewlett
Wattles, John O., 300.
"The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume IV" by Various
De Vault, Miss Wattles.
"The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume VI" by Various
The Potawatomi were peaceful, John Wattles, who describes their winter habitations, visited them often in his boyhood days.
"The Land of the Miamis" by Elmore Barce
Mr. Wattles told me that the judge had been convinced, as far back as 1863, that the cause was nearly hopeless.
"A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital" by John Beauchamp Jones
WATTLES, SUSAN E., suff.
"The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony (Volume 2 of 2)" by Ida Husted Harper
It was of wattle and clay, and the grass grew green upon the roof.
"The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 8 (of 25)" by Robert Louis Stevenson
Copyright, 1898, BY JOHN D. WATTLES & CO.
"Training the Teacher" by A. F. Schauffler
This wattle church survived the violent changes which swept over the face of the land.
"The Christian Church in These Islands before the Coming of Augustine" by George Forrest Browne
Having found the wattled homes of the beaver, the trapper may proceed in different ways.
"The Story of the Trapper" by A. C. Laut
It was a hut built of clay and wattles.
"Twenty-Four Unusual Stories for Boys and Girls" by Anna Cogswell Tyler
The creek banks on either side were fringed I with wattles and light-woods.
"The Pioneers" by Katharine Susannah Prichard
It was the highway when roads were only tracks and the boats in which men voyaged were of wattle covered with hide.
"Nooks and Corners of Cornwall" by C. A. Dawson Scott
Who does not know the harsh note of the Wattle-Bird (Wattled Honey-eater)?
"An Australian Bird Book" by John Albert Leach
In their little wattled hut they would have been perfectly happy but for one thing which now and then they remembered and grieved over.
"Moonshine & Clover" by Laurence Housman
Subsequently it was a lodge made of earth, of stone or wattle work or adobe.
"Woman in Science" by John Augustine Zahm
The wattles of his neck were blood-gorged.
"King Spruce, A Novel" by Holman Day
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In poetry:

He was her lover, too,
Who urged her so —
"Why should not wattle do
For mistletoe?"
"Under The Wattle" by Douglas Brooke Wheelton Sladen
"Why should not wattle do
For mistletoe?"
Asked one — they were but two —
Where wattles grow.
"Under The Wattle" by Douglas Brooke Wheelton Sladen
The wattle and the waratah—
The world has heard of those;
But who, outside Australia, kens
The little Native Rose.
"The Little Native Rose" by Henry Lawson
How she then wore it on the brows,
Yet am I glad to have her dead
Here in this wretched wattled house
Where I can kiss her eyes and head.
"The Leper" by Algernon Charles Swinburne
Your eyes are clear Australian blue,
Your voice like soft bush breezes blown;
Her sunshine steeps the heart of you,
Your tresses are the wattle's own.
"Come, Sing Australian songs to me!" by John O Brien
"'I wish," sez she, "I could be back again
Beneath the wattle an' that great blue sky.
It's like a breath uv 'ome to meet you men.
You've done reel well," she sez. "Don't you be shy.
When yer in Blighty once again," sez she, "Come an' see me."
"A Digger's Tale" by C J Dennis

In news:

STOCKHOLM (AFP) — A hen in southern Sweden that has grown a rooster comb, tail and wattle and begun to crow is wreaking havoc in its henhouse, where the rooster, Henry VIII, is hopping mad, Swedish media reported on Friday.
STOCKHOLM (AFP) — A hen in southern Sweden that has grown a rooster comb, tail and wattle and begun to crow is wreaking havoc in its henhouse , where the rooster, Henry VIII, is hopping mad, Swedish media reported on Friday.
At 3 months old, their combs and wattles are small and pale.
Two of many ancient earth-building techniques—which include wattle-and-daub and adobe—-are rammed earth and pisé de terre, prehistoric construction methods that predate the development of the opposable thumb.
Michot built a home using bousillage, a cousin to wattle and daub.
A wattled crane is the National Zoo's newest addition.
On March 20, a wattled crane cracked its egg to become the third of its species to hatch in the National Zoo's history.
Red Wattle Originally bred in New Orleans, Wattles have a wild, porky taste that's ideal for Creole cuisine.
The mature wattle toppled from a bank above the houses in a valley off Mokoia Rd about 2pm.
Get a medium sized pumpkin, a gourd that has a curved neck, five Indian corn with the husks and something red for the wattle.
From left, Trenton Wattles, Bradlee Squiers, Principal Mark Bea, Takianna Payne, and Lauren Wilcox staff an informational table at a fundraising dinner this month.
The inaugural Thanksgiving Wattle, a Thanksgiving-morning 5K walk/run in Grove City, will benefit participants' health as well as two local charities.
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In science:

Fig.5b The same Rooster-Hen, showing the difference in wattles.
A Developmental Network Theory of Gynandromorphs, Sexual Dimorphism and Species Formation
The right side is female (brown) with small wattles, left side is male with large wattles.
A Developmental Network Theory of Gynandromorphs, Sexual Dimorphism and Species Formation
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