walnut

Definitions

  • Black Walnut
    Black Walnut
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n walnut nut of any of various walnut trees having a wrinkled two-lobed seed with a hard shell
    • n walnut any of various trees of the genus Juglans
    • n walnut hard dark-brown wood of any of various walnut trees; used especially for furniture and paneling
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Additional illustrations & photos:

Portion of Carved Walnut Virginal Portion of Carved Walnut Virginal
WALNUT SIDEBOARD WALNUT SIDEBOARD
CABINET OF WALNUT CABINET OF WALNUT
UPPER HALF OF CARVED WALNUT DOOR UPPER HALF OF CARVED WALNUT DOOR
QUEEN ANNE WALNUT CABINET QUEEN ANNE WALNUT CABINET
QUEEN ANNE WALNUT ARMCHAIR. BLACK AND GOLD LAC CHAIR QUEEN ANNE WALNUT ARMCHAIR. BLACK AND GOLD LAC CHAIR
CHIPPENDALE SETTEE; WALNUT CHIPPENDALE SETTEE; WALNUT

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Romans used to believe that walnuts could cure head ailments during the Renaissance, since their shape was similar to that of a brain
    • n Walnut (Bot) The fruit or nut of any tree of the genus Juglans; also, the tree, and its timber. The seven or eight known species are all natives of the north temperate zone.☞ In some parts of America, especially in New England, the name walnut is given to several species of hickory (Carya), and their fruit.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • walnut In the West Indies, a name often applied to the angelin or cabbage-tree, Vouacapoua Americana, from its resemblance in leaf and fruit to the English walnut. See cabbage-tree, 2, and Andira.
    • n walnut The fruit of the nut-bearing tree Juglans regia; also, the tree itself, or its wood. The walnut-tree is native from the Caucasus and Armenia to the mountains of northern India, and is extensively cultivated, and in some places naturalized, in temperate Europe. It grows from 40 to 60 or even 100 feet high, with a massive trunk and broad spreading top, and bears pinnate leaves with few smooth leaf lets. It produces the well-known sweet-seeded nuts of this name, in America distinguished as English walnuts. These are surrounded with a thin, brittle, and easily separated husk. The shell is thin in different degrees, or in the wild state thicker. The kernel yields some50 per cent, of oil, which is largely expressed in France and other parts of Europe, as also in Asia. That of the first pressing is used for food, like olive-oil, though ranked less highly; that of the second pressing, called fire-drawn, the cake having been submitted to boiling water, is more siccative even than linseed-oil, and hence is by some artists the most highly esteemed of all oils; it is a good lamp-oil, and is available for making soft-soap, etc. The whole fruit when quite young makes a good pickle. The shell of a large variety, called double walnut, is used in France for making purses, cases for jewelry, etc. The leaves and the hull of the fruit are used in Europe for various medicinal purposes. Walnut-wood is light, tough, and handsome, plain or with a bur; before the introduction of mahogany it was the leading cabinet-wood of Europe, and is still preferred to all other wood for gunstocks.
    • n walnut In the United States, frequently, same as black walnut and rock-walnut (the fruit, the tree, or its wood). See below.
    • n walnut In parts of New York, New England, and some other lo calities, same as hickory-nut or hickory. This is sometimes distinguished as shagbark or shell-bark walnut.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Walnut wawl′nut a genus (Juglans) comprising seven or eight species of beautiful trees of natural order Juglandaceæ—the wood of the common walnut is much used for furniture and gunstocks; its ripe fruit is one of the best of nuts, and yields an oil used by artists, &c
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. walnot, AS. wealh-hnutu, a Welsh or foreign nut, a walnut; wealh, foreign, strange, n., a Welshman, Celt (akin to OHG. Walh, properly, a Celt, from the name of a Celtic tribe, in L. Volcae,) + hnutu, a nut; akin to D. walnoot, G. walnuss, Icel. valhnot, Sw. valnöt, Dan valnöd,. See Nut, and cf. Welsh
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. wealh, foreign, hnut, a nut; Ger. wallnuss.

Usage

In literature:

So Rollo put the walnut into the crack.
"Rollo's Experiments" by Jacob Abbott
The walnut chairs were there, quite placid and content with themselves, and the hat-rack, and the old horsehair sofa.
"Stubble" by George Looms
The skipper and Don Gregorio, sitting over their walnuts and wine, are startled by the sound of footsteps descending the stair.
"The Flag of Distress" by Mayne Reid
That was because they usually went walnutting before the walnuts were ripe.
"Boy Life" by William Dean Howells
Upon examination he found it to be a fine species of walnut.
"Blue Ridge Country" by Jean Thomas
Why, a great walnut, and out of that the water trickled.
"Children's Literature" by Charles Madison Curry
Make out into balls, each ball about as big as a walnut.
"The Khaki Kook Book" by Mary Kennedy Core
This pudding can be made of walnuts and port-wine cream.
"Choice Cookery" by Catherine Owen
Add walnuts and bake in moderate oven, 375 degrees.
"Pennsylvania Dutch Cooking" by Unknown
They are closely allied to the walnut, and the wood is very like walnut in grain and color, though of a somewhat darker brown.
"Seasoning of Wood" by Joseph B. Wagner
I had selected a spot on top of a ridge, where the maples and walnuts grew thick.
"A Virginia Scout" by Hugh Pendexter
You couldn't have anything lovelier than this dull walnut with the yellow walls.
"At the Sign of the Jack O'Lantern" by Myrtle Reed
The black walnut is much used for building materials and cabinet work, and sustains a fine polish.
"A New Guide for Emigrants to the West" by J. M. Peck
Pomegranates, figs, peaches, apricots, melons, walnuts, and almonds reach a rare perfection.
"The Book of the National Parks" by Robert Sterling Yard
The Walnut is a native of Persia and China, and its foreign origin is told in all its names.
"The plant-lore and garden-craft of Shakespeare" by Henry Nicholson Ellacombe
At last Forrest was promised an appearance at the Walnut Street house, then one of the leading theatres of the country.
"Great Men and Famous Women, Vol. 8 (of 8)" by Various
Where are the walnuts, Naka Machi?
"The Mind Master" by Arthur J. Burks
She asked the children to sit down, gave them some sugared walnuts, and said she would go and ask her son to take them home.
"The Little Girl Lost" by Eleanor Raper
Over went walnut whatnots, and out came mutterings that made him hotter than ever for very shame.
"" by E.W. Hornung
The woods used were ebony, box, walnut, and white poplar, and the cost was 3152 lire.
"Intarsia and Marquetry" by F. Hamilton Jackson
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In poetry:

A happy vicar I might have been
Two hundred years ago
To preach upon eternal doom
And watch my walnuts grow;
"A Little Poem" by George Orwell
His mother in her apron took
Her gentle son in haste,
And by the fire-side, within
A walnut-shell him placed ;
"The Life And Death Of Tom Thumb" by Anonymous British
There haply with her jewelled hands
She smooths her silken gown,—
No more the homespun lap wherein
I shook the walnuts down.
"My Playmate" by John Greenleaf Whittier
I seem to see their Spirits stand,
Molded of moonlight, faint of form and face,
Now reaching high a chilly hand
To pluck some walnut from its spicy place:
"Under The Hunter’s Moon" by Madison Julius Cawein
Good luck to us all! Over walnuts and wine
We hear the rare songs that we know
Are as brimful of mirth as the spring is of shine,
And as healthy and hearty, we trow.
"Euterpe: A Cantanta" by Henry Kendall
The blunt, clumsy stumblers, the boors.
Winter is for women ——
The woman, still at her knitting,
At the cradle of Spanis walnut,
Her body a bulb in the cold and too dumb to think.
"Wintering" by Sylvia Plath

In news:

Linguine with Walnut & Broccoli Rabe Pesto Recipe.
Asparagus With Walnuts, Parmesan and Brown Butter .
In conjunction with ArtsFest on Historic Walnut Street May 1.
Fold in chopped cranberries and walnuts.
Watch Cristina Ferrare make her homemade Orange Walnut Cranberry Sauce and more holiday recipes.
Watch Cristina Ferrare whip up her Orange Walnut Cranberry sauce and learn how you can make it at home.
The Applebee's restaurant at 28th Street and Walnut in Boulder.
And Anthony Howard, who lived at the Walnut Street house, was shot in the back and later died at University Hospital, authorities said.
Walnut Creek to cut water consumption.
The Village of Walnut Creek is following suit in water conservation.
Bizarre day-laborer kidnapping in Lafayette lands Walnut Creek man in jail, police say.
Glen Laney , longtime former resident of Sonoma, passed away in Walnut Creek on Friday, Oct 26, 2012, at the age of 87.
Neva Coester was born to Hallie French Boyd and William S Boyd near Walnut on Feb 15, 1917.
She attended school in Crawford County, graduating from Walnut High School in 1934.After graduation, she worked at the courthouse in Girard until her marriage to Leland Coester in 1937.
Bags of walnuts and persimmons are signs that the fall season is well under way at Peacock Family Farms of Nipimo, where Linda Peacock said the summer crops are about spent.
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In science:

Of course, such a proof of the CLT is like to crack a walnut with a sledgehammer.
Lectures on Gaussian approximations with Malliavin calculus
Supposedly agent A should omit a warrant is if it is already believed by B, so that the speaker in 1 would not have said It’s shorter if she believed that the hearer knew that the Walnut St. route was shorter.
Discourse and Deliberation: Testing a Collaborative Strategy
These algebras have been used effectively in the study of Gabor systems by Benedetto, Heil, Walnut, Feichtinger, Zimmerman and Strohmer ( See chapters 2,3 and 8 of ).
A Hilbert C*-module for Gabor systems
Janssen, Weyl-Heisenberg frames, invariant systems, and the Walnut representation. preprint. P.G.
A Hilbert C*-module for Gabor systems
David Walnut, Nonperiodic sampling of band limited functions on unions of rectangular lattices, J.
The Geometry of Sampling on Unions of Lattices
In Section 3.2 a Walnut representation and a corresponding bound of the frame operator in the general setting is derived and Section 3.3 provides the existence of nonstationary Gabor frames.
Nonstationary Gabor Frames - Existence and Construction
The diagonality of the frame operator in the painless case is derived from a generalized Walnut representation for the frame operator Sg ,g of nonstationary Gabor frames.
Nonstationary Gabor Frames - Existence and Construction
Walnut, Linear independence of Gabor systems in finite dimensional vector spaces, J.
Linear independence of time-frequency translates of functions with faster than exponential decay
If the signal is instead sampled multiple times at different, carefully chosen sampling rates, Berenstein and Patrick (1990) and Casey and Walnut (1994) find conditions under which the original signal can be reconstructed in a loss-less way.
Efficient Estimators for Sequential and Resolution-Limited Inverse Problems
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