volatilise

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v volatilise make volatile; cause to pass off in a vapor
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.t Volatilise to make volatile: to cause to evaporate
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Etymology

Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Fr.,—L. volans, antis, pr.p. of volāre, to fly.

Usage

In literature:

This is the fluor acid which volatilises the siliceous substance.
"Theory of the Earth, Volume 1 (of 4)" by James Hutton
Where the burning is accompanied by smoke, there is an apparent return of volatilised matter to solid form.
"Nature Mysticism" by J. Edward Mercer
On separating the one from the other, a brilliant arc containing the mercury in a volatilised condition passes between them.
"Fragments of science, V. 1-2" by John Tyndall
It is the evaporation, or, more properly speaking, the volatilisation of solid substances, which, in cooling, condense again in a concrete form.
"Conversations on Chemistry, V. 1-2" by Jane Marcet
Because the chances of loss by volatilisation are thereby increased.
"Manures and the principles of manuring" by Charles Morton Aikman
The low ceiling was fused where the day poured through, became a candent vapour, volatilised.
"The Sea and the Jungle" by H. M. Tomlinson
The literal meaning is a finely volatilised substance, and in Numbers xxiii.
"Demonology and Devil-lore" by Moncure Daniel Conway
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In science:

Cellulose can undergo two forms of competing degradation reaction: volatilisation and char formation (Figure 2).
A review of wildland fire spread modelling, 1990-present, 1: Physical and quasi-physical models
Volatilisation generally occurs in conditions of low or nil moisture and involves thermolysis of glycosidic linkages, cyclisation and the release of free levoglucosan via thermolysis at the next linkage in the chain (Ball et al., 2004).
A review of wildland fire spread modelling, 1990-present, 1: Physical and quasi-physical models
The initial product is a reducing end which has ‘lost the opportunity’ to volatilise.
A review of wildland fire spread modelling, 1990-present, 1: Physical and quasi-physical models
The coupling comes from the fact that when the solid volatilises it releases flammable gas that then combusts, returning a portion of the released energy back to the solid for further volatilisation.
A review of wildland fire spread modelling, 1990-present, 1: Physical and quasi-physical models
Volatilisation into levoglucosan (V) in the absence of moisture is endothermic.
A review of wildland fire spread modelling, 1990-present, 1: Physical and quasi-physical models
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