vertical section

Definitions

  • Vertical Stationary Engine, Section
    Vertical Stationary Engine, Section
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n vertical section a mechanical drawing showing the interior of an object as if made by a vertical plane passing through it
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Additional illustrations & photos:

Vertical Section of the Brain Vertical Section of the Brain
Vertical Section of the Eye Vertical Section of the Eye

Usage

In literature:

A plan and vertical section of the tomb should be drawn.
"How to Observe in Archaeology" by Various
Vertical section of the cerebrum.
"The People's Common Sense Medical Adviser in Plain English" by R. V. Pierce
A vertical section of it is shown in Fig.
"How it Works" by Archibald Williams
If you could have cut a vertical section through Audrey's soul, you would have found it built up in successive layers of soul.
"Audrey Craven" by May Sinclair
A section of a few feet in vertical extent presented me with four distinct periods.
"My Schools and Schoolmasters" by Hugh Miller
Same in vertical section.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 7" by Various
It is a sort of greenish, transparent mist; it resembles the vertical section of a canal filled with water.
"The Mysteries of Paris, Volume 2 of 6" by Eugène Sue
Vertical sections, having an ordinary height of from 50 to 70 feet, are there exposed to view for a distance of about 20 miles.
"A Manual of Elementary Geology" by Charles Lyell
Vertical and transverse sections of seed showing embryo in position.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 9, Slice 8" by Various
A flat door with heavy vertical handle, round in section, fits snugly into opening.
"North Devon Pottery and Its Export to America in the 17th Century" by C. Malcolm Watkins
Hence the Eye can only be displayed by making a vertical section of the fruit.
"American Pomology" by J. A. Warder
Flower in vertical section.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 12, Slice 1" by Various
Draw also a vertical section through the axis.
"An Introduction to Machine Drawing and Design" by David Allan Low
This exhibition shows a vertical section of the natural formation of the earth to the depth of six feet from the surface.
"Autobiography of Charles Clinton Nourse" by Charles Clinton Nourse
Vertical section of fruit.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 15, Slice 5" by Various
Vertical section Coupe verticale.
"English-French and French-English dictionary of the motor car, cycle, and boat" by Frederick Lucas
Two longitudinal and vertical sections through the head of a Pristiurus embryo belonging to stage K. Zeiss a, ocul.
"The Works of Francis Maitland Balfour, Volume 1" by Francis Maitland Balfour
Vertical section of twig, summer bud and leaf petiole, enlarged.
"Michigan Trees" by Charles Herbert Otis
The salient features, shown in vertical cross section in Fig.
"The Progress of Invention in the Nineteenth Century." by Edward W. Byrn
A vertical section of this mound is shown in Fig.
"Burial Mounds of the Northern Sections of the United States" by Cyrus Thomas
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In news:

This rendition of Evans' free body diagram of a section of hydraulic hose shows that horizontal and vertical forces from hydrostatic pressure act at the mean diameter (Dm) of the hose reinforcement.
It managed to return to base with severe battle damage and the big bomber could still fly even with largest sections of the huge vertical tail shot away.
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In science:

In section 4.3 we give an example of the topological phase transition in a locally homogeneous graph, where all vertices have isomorphic 1-neighborhoods.
Gibbs and Quantum Discrete Spaces
In Section 3 we introduced a Markov process (Λn )n≥0 of collapsing hypergraphs, starting from Λ0 ∼ Poisson(β ) and stopping when n = |V ∗ |, the number of identifiable vertices in Λ0 .
Structure of large random hypergraphs
Cross sections are calculated within the framework of a specific model, i.e. they depend on a set of assumptions and parameters like the particle spectrum and the properties (quantum numbers) of the particles as well as their interactions defined via vertices and the corresponding coupling constants.
AMEGIC++ 1.0, A Matrix Element Generator In C++
The different methods of the classes are described in detail in the subsequent sections, covering the complexes Flavour, Vertices, Model, Spectrum and Couplings.
AMEGIC++ 1.0, A Matrix Element Generator In C++
Consider for instance the third example from Section 3.2, of a graph in which all vertices have degree three or less.
Random graphs as models of networks
If this were possible, then, as in Section 2, one could use the ratio of the numbers of vertices at different distances to derive a condition for the position of the phase transition at which a giant component forms on a clustered graph.
Random graphs as models of networks
The variation of Φ under the vertical vector field V is the section eψs (Φ) := ψs ◦ Φ ∈ Γ(π).
Hyperhamiltonian dynamics
The first step, n = 1, consists of making one vertical section of the square.
A Random Multifractal Tilling
In the third step, n = 3, we repeat the same process of vertical section as in step n = 1.
A Random Multifractal Tilling
Let us suppose that the Lagrangian L (16) is invariant under some gauge group GX of vertical automorphisms of the fiber bundle Y → X which acts freely on the space of sections of Y → X .
BV quantization of a generic degenerate quadratic lagrangian
Theorem 2.2 (proved in Section 5) Let {X (σ)} be i.i.d. random variables indexed by the vertices of Γ, and let S (σ) = Pρ<τ ≤σ X (τ ).
Critical RWRE on trees and tree-indexed random walks
But in Section 6 we will present a single-vertical-slice calculation of a situation in which grain fragmentation is included.
Dust coagulation in protoplanetary disks: a rapid depletion of small grains
As our disk vertical structure we adopt the same structure as in Section 3.
Dust coagulation in protoplanetary disks: a rapid depletion of small grains
Generalizing the notion from Section 2, we denote by ˜St (v) := {u ∈ Rt (v) : ϕ(u) > ϕ(wt (v))} [i⋆ = i] ≥ the set of vertices in Rt (v) left behind while walking from v to Rt (v).
Two New Bounds on the Random-Edge Simplex Algorithm
In Section 3 we introduced a Markov process (Λn )n≥0 of collapsing hypergraphs, starting from Λ0 ∼ Poisson(β ) and stopping when n = |V ∗ |, the number of identifiable vertices in Λ0 .
Structure of large random hypergraphs
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