vaccinate

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v vaccinate perform vaccinations or produce immunity in by inoculation "We vaccinate against scarlet fever","The nurse vaccinated the children in the school"
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: The word vaccine comes from the Latin word "vacca," which means cow. This name was chosen beacause the first vaccination was derived from cowpox which was given to a boy
    • v. t Vaccinate To inoculate with the cowpox by means of a virus, called vaccine, taken either directly or indirectly from cows; now, generally, to administer (by injection or otherwise) any vaccine with the objective of rendering the recipient immune to an infectious disease. One who has been thus immunized by vaccination is said to be vaccinated against a particular disease. One may be thus immunized (vaccinated) also by oral ingestion or inhalation of a vaccine.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: Dr. Maurice R. Hilleman is considered to be the godfather of the modern vaccine era. Having created nearly three dozen vaccines - more than any other scientist, Hilleman is also credited with saving more lives than any other scientist. Probably best known for his preventive vaccine for mumps, Hilleman has also developed vaccines for measles, rubella, chicken pox, bacterial meningitis, flu and hepatitis B.
    • vaccinate To inoculate with the cowpox, by means of vaccine matter or lymph taken directly or indirectly from the cow, for the purpose of procuring immunity from smallpox or of mitigating its attack.
    • vaccinate In a general sense, to inoculate with the modified virus of any specific disease, in order to produce that disease in a mild form or to prevent its attack.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Dr. Jonas Salk developed the vaccine for polio in 1952, in New York (aaah!).
    • v.t Vaccinate vak′si-nāt to inoculate with the cowpox as a preventive against smallpox
    • n Vaccinate the virus of cowpox or vaccinia used in the process of vaccination
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Quotations

  • Samuel Butler
    Samuel%20Butler
    “Vaccination is the medical sacrament corresponding to baptism.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
See Vaccine

Usage

In literature:

That will vaccinate you in four.
"The Hero of Garside School" by J. Harwood Panting
The opponents of vaccination also designate vaccination as a frequent cause of scrofula.
"Prof. Koch's Method to Cure Tuberculosis Popularly Treated" by Max Birnbaum
At stated periods, children may be brought for vaccination.
"The Fulfilment of a Dream of Pastor Hsi's" by A. Mildred Cable
From the time we lived at Sarawak a continual effort was made to introduce vaccination.
"Sketches of Our Life at Sarawak" by Harriette McDougall
Discovery of Vaccination, a parody of tragic style; one act only was written.
"Madame Bovary" by Gustave Flaubert
He vaccinated a number.
"A Journal of a Young Man of Massachusetts, 2nd ed." by Benjamin Waterhouse
Diseases are not introduced with vaccination now that the vaccine matter is taken from calves and not from the human being, as formerly.
"The Home Medical Library, Volume I (of VI)" by Various
A single shot of vaccine could not stem an epidemic.
"The Great Gray Plague" by Raymond F. Jones
ON CARPET STRETCHING, AND VACCINATION FROM THE CALF.
"Somehow Good" by William de Morgan
Good results have followed the use of vaccines and improvement of the general health.
"Manual of Surgery Volume Second: Extremities--Head--Neck. Sixth Edition." by Alexander Miles
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In poetry:

Oh, that land of plague and pestilence
Where the natives die in shoals
And they have to vaccinate them
Till their torsos' filled with holes.
"Mandalay 1" by Billy Bennett
“Those wedding bells shall not ring out!”
She cried - all agitated
“For her name is not Dick Whittington
And she hasn’t been vaccinated.”
"The Wedding That Never Was" by Billy Bennett

In news:

She has been vaccinated, spayed and microchipped.
Courtesy of Wyeth Vaccines and MedImmune Vaccines, Inc (PRNewsFoto).
The first effective vaccine for whooping cough was developed in 1940.
Vaccinations cleared in babies' celiac 'epidemic'.
Vaccinations don't explain babies' celiac disease, study finds.
It's National Influenza Vaccination Week.
Cats are available for adoption at J.B. Ogle Animal Shelter for $15, which includes vaccinations, microchipping and spay or neutering.
Chickenpox Deaths Plummeted Since Vaccine.
Health officials are offering chickenpox vaccinations for students at a northeastern Indiana school where several children have come down with the illness.
Potential side effects of the flu vaccine can include a low-grade fever and aches.
At Polio's Epicenter, Vaccinators Battle Chaos And Indifference.
Some dairies are finding 25% abortion rates following vaccination with modified-live IBR vaccines.
In addition to explaining why vaccines can sometimes fail, I also take the opportunity to explain how producers can help tip the scales in their favor when it comes to vaccine success.
Influenza vaccine recommendations from CDC call for everyone age six months or older to be vaccinated.
OTTAWA — A Canadian vaccine expert says there are fatal flaws in a study the government used as a main reason to kill off a plan to build an HIV-vaccine pilot-manufacturing facility in Canada.
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In science:

Starczak, Optimal vaccination strategies for a community of households, Math.
The Spread of Infectious Disease with Household-Structure on the Complex Networks
The vaccinator is thus interested in ν (G, Cδn ) for small values of δ . (For further details and for variations on this theme, see .) In both studies it is natural to consider the behaviour of these parameters on two standard models of sparse random graphs.
Dismantling sparse random graphs
The implemented prototype is exemplified by modelling the MMR vaccine controversy.
Using Semantic Wikis for Structured Argument in Medical Domain
Argumentation scenario for MMR vaccine controversy.
Using Semantic Wikis for Structured Argument in Medical Domain
We study the effect of vaccination on robustness of networks against propagating attacks that obey the susceptible-infected-removed model.
Robustness of networks against propagating attacks under vaccination strategies
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