unit

Definitions

  • ROADS THROUGH THE ASPENS Range: Northern United States and Canada, south in the Rocky Mountains to Mexico. Photograph by Albert E. Butler
    ROADS THROUGH THE ASPENS Range: Northern United States and Canada, south in the Rocky Mountains to Mexico. Photograph by Albert E. Butler
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n unit an assemblage of parts that is regarded as a single entity "how big is that part compared to the whole?","the team is a unit"
    • n unit a single undivided whole "an idea is not a unit that can be moved from one brain to another"
    • n unit an organization regarded as part of a larger social group "the coach said the offensive unit did a good job","after the battle the soldier had trouble rejoining his unit"
    • n unit a single undivided natural thing occurring in the composition of something else "units of nucleic acids"
    • n unit any division of quantity accepted as a standard of measurement or exchange "the dollar is the United States unit of currency","a unit of wheat is a bushel","change per unit volume"
    • n unit an individual or group or structure or other entity regarded as a structural or functional constituent of a whole "the reduced the number of units and installations","the word is a basic linguistic unit"
    • ***

Additional illustrations & photos:

Steamship United States Steamship United States
Map of Louisiana Purchase; also United States in 1803 Map of Louisiana Purchase; also United States in 1803
Map of the United States showing the Southern Confederacy, the Slave States that did not Secede, and the Territories Map of the United States showing the Southern Confederacy, the Slave States that did not Secede, and the Territories
The United States Coast and the West Indies The United States Coast and the West Indies

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: In the United States, every year about 15 people die from dog bites
    • Unit A gold coin of the reign of James I., of the value of twenty shillings.
    • Unit A single thing or person.
    • Unit (Math) A single thing, as a magnitude or number, regarded as an undivided whole.
    • Unit Any determinate amount or quantity (as of length, time, heat, value) adopted as a standard of measurement for other amounts or quantities of the same kind.
    • Unit (Arith) The least whole number; one. "Units are the integral parts of any large number."
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: Approximately 125 people die in the United States from an anaphylaxis to foods each year
    • n unit Any subdivision of an army having a distinct organization and defined duties.
    • n unit According to the hypothesis of Herbert Spencer, an ultimate biological unit or element which, when joined to others like itself, possesses the power to become a specific organism. The body of each individual organism is held to consist of its own sort of physiological units which are all alike and nearly, but not completely, identical with those which compose the body of another individual of the same species. The physiological unit is held to be intermediate between the molecule or chemical unit and the cell or morphological unit, each cell being regarded as composed of innumerable physiological units each of which again consists of innumerable molecules. The physiological units are held to make each organism and each species what it is and to have the aptitude to contribute to the construction of the organism in virtue of their polarity. The hypothesis of physiological units is advanced as an explanation of the facts of inheritance in general, and, especially, the generation of living beings from eggs and the regeneration or replacement of lost parts. The organism is able to replace lost parts because the polarity of the units, it is said, causes them to restore the organism to its perfect condition under the directive influence of the whole, which forces the units to arrange themselves in just such a way as is necessary for the perfection of the part in the harmony of the whole. A germ-cell is held to contain small groups of these units which, by their polarity, give to it the power to reproduce the whole.
    • n unit According to Bateson, an ultimate element or unit of inheritance, of unknown nature, of which an allelomorph or character-unit is the sensible manifestation.
    • n unit In the centesimal method, a grade.
    • n unit Acre-foot, a unit used in irrigation; the volume of water required to cover one acre to a depth of one foot, = 43,560 cubic feet, = 1,233.49 cubic meters.
    • n unit Ampere, a practical unit of electrical current, = 0.1 c. g. s. unit.
    • n unit Ampere (international), the ampere as defined for practical purposes by the International Congress at Chicago in 1893, as the current required to deposit 0.001118 gram of silver in a second of time. This value was subsequently legalized in the United States and was re-adopted by the Electrical Conference in England (1908), although the value 0.0011183 was known to be more nearly correct.
    • n unit Ampere-hour, =3,600 coulombs, =360 c. g. s. units (electromagnetic).
    • n unit Ampere-second, =1 coulomb.
    • n unit Ampere-turn, a unit of magnetomotive force, =4 π/10 c. g. s. units, =1.256637 gilberts.
    • n unit Angström unit, =0.0000001 millimeter, =0.0001 micron.
    • n unit Arc, = 100 square meters, =1,076.387 square feet.
    • n unit Atmosphere, a unit of fluid pressure, = the pressure of a column of mercury 76 centimeters in height, =1,013,240 dynes per square centimeter. Sometimes an atmosphere is defined as a pressure of 1 kilogram per square centimeter.
    • n unit Bougie décimale, a unit of intensity of light originally defined as 1/20 of a violle; subsequently (by the Geneva Congress of Photometricians), as equal to 1 hefner.
    • n unit Bougie de l'étoile, a unit of intensity of light used in France; the light from a stearin candle burning 10 grams per hour, = 1/7 carcels (approximately).
    • n unit British thermal unit, the heat required to raise one pound (avoir.) of water one degree Fahrenheit, = 1,054.90 joules, = 251.996 calories, = 778.104 foot-pounds, = 0.000392982 horse-power hour, = 0.293027 watt-hour.
    • n unit Calory, a calorimetric unit; the heat required to raise one gram of water one degree centigrade (also called a gram-calory or small calory), =4.18617 joules, = 3.08777 foot-pounds, =0.003968 British thermal unit, = 0.00116282 watt-hour.
    • n unit Candle (British standard), a unit of intensity of light; the light from a spermaceti candle of specified composition, size, and form (see standard candle), = 1.136 Hefner units.
    • n unit Candle (German; German Vereinskerze), a unit of intensity of light; the light from a paraffin candle having a diameter of 20 millimeters and a flame height of 50 millimeters, =1.16 … 1.224 Hefner units (approximately), =1.05 British standard candles (approximately).
    • n unit Candle (Munich), a unit of intensity of light; the light from a stearin candle of conical form, =0.153 carcel (approximately), =1.17. British standard candles (approximately).
    • n unit Candle (star). See bougie de l'étoile (above).
    • n unit Candle-foot. See foot-candle (below).
    • n unit Candle-meter. See meter-candle (below).
    • n unit Carcel, a unit of intensity of light formerly used in France; the light from a lamp of Argand type with mechanical draft, =10.87 … 10.90 Hefner units (approximately), =9.53 British candles (approximately).
    • n unit Centimeter, =0.01 meter, =0.393700 inch.
    • n unit Centimeter (cubic), =0.001 liter, =0.0610234 cubic inch.
    • n unit C. G. S. unit of acceleration, an acceleration of one centimeter per second per second, =0.00101979 of the acceleration due to gravity.
    • n unit C. G. S. unit of capacity (electromagnetic), the capacity of a condenser the charge of which at unit potential (c. g. s.) is one c. g. s. unit of quantity or 10 coulombs, = 1 × 109 farads.
    • n unit C. G. S. unit of capacity (electrostatic), =1/9 × 10–20 c. g. s. units of capacity of the electromagnetic system (approximately), =1/9 × 10–11 farads (approximately).
    • n unit C. G. S. unit of electric charge (electromagnetic), the charge transferred by one c. g. s. unit of current in one second of time, =10 coulombs, =0.00277778 ampere-hour, = 3 × 1010 electrostatic units (approximately).
    • n unit C. G. S. unit of electric charge (electrostatic), the charge which in air exerts a force of one dyne on an equal charge at a distance of one centimeter, =1/v c. g. s. units (electromagnetic), =10/V coulombs or 1/3 × 10coulombs (approximately).
    • n unit C. G. S. unit of electric current, the current which, flowing in a circular coil of one centimeter radius, produces at the center of the coil a magnetic field of 2μ units intensity, =10 amperes.
    • n unit C. G. S. unit of electrical resistance, =1 × 10–9 ohms.
    • n unit C. G. S. unit of electromotive force, =1 × 10–8 volts.
    • n unit C. G. S. unit of energy, =1 erg, = 0.0000001 joule.
    • n unit C. G. S. unit of force, =1 dyne, =0.00101979 of the force due to a gram, = 0 000002248 of the force due to a pound, =0.00007233 poundal.
    • n unit C. G. S. unit of inductance, the inductance which gives one c. g. s. unit of electromotive force when the current is changing at the rate of one c. g. s. unit per second, =1 × 10–9 henrys.
    • n unit C. G. S. unit of magnetic flux, the flux which acts with a force of one dyne on a unit magnetic pole, = 1 maxwell, = 1 line of force, = 1/4 μ of the flux from a unit pole.
    • n unit C. G. S. unit of magnetic induction (or flux density), a flux density of one line of force, or maxwell per square centimeter; the magnetic induction in a field which exerts a force of one dyne upon a unit pole placed in it, = 1 gauss.
    • n unit C. G. S. unit of magnetomotive force, the magnetomotive force that gives one c. g. s. unit of magnetic flux through one c. g. s. unit of reluctance, = 1 gilbert, = 10/4 μ ampere-turns.
    • n unit C. G. S. unit of permeance (or magnetic conductance), the reciprocal of one unit of reluctance.
    • n unit C. G. S. unit of power, = 1 erg per second.
    • n unit C. G. S. unit of reluctance (or magnetic resistance), that reluctance (or resistance) through which a c. g. s. unit of magnetomotive force gives a c. g. s. unit of magnetic flux, = 1 oersted.
    • n unit C. G. S. unit of velocity, a velocity of one centimeter per second.
    • n unit Chain (surveyors'), = 66.00 feet, =20.117 meters.
    • n unit Coulomb, a practical unit of electric charge, = 0.1 c. g. s. unit (electromagnetic), = 1 ampere-second, =0.000277778 ampere-hour.
    • n unit Coulomb (international), the charge transferred by one international ampere in one second of time.
    • n unit Daniell, a former practical unit of electromotive force; the electromotive force of a Daniell cell, = 1.08 to 1.10 volts.
    • n unit Day (astronomical), the twenty-four hours from noon to noon (mean solar time).
    • n unit Day (calendar day), the twenty-four hours from midnight to midnight (mean solar time).
    • n unit Day (civil). Same as calendar day (above).
    • n unit Day (mean solar), = 86,400 mean solar seconds, =86,636.55 sidereal seconds, = 1.002737 sidereal days.
    • n unit Day (sidereal), = 86,164.1 mean solar seconds, =86,400 sidereal seconds, =0.997269 mean solar day.
    • n unit Degree (of arc), =0.0174533 radian.
    • n unit Degree (of latitude), =60 nautical miles at equator (approximately), = 69.00 statute miles at 40° lat.
    • n unit Degree (of longitude), =60 nautical miles at equator (approximately), =53.05 statute miles at 40° lat.
    • n unit Degree (Celsius). Same as a degree centigrade (below).
    • n unit Degree (centigrade), = 1/100 of the interval between the ice-point and the steam-point of a thermometer, =9/5 of a degree Fahrenheit.
    • n unit Degree (Fahrenheit), = 1/180 of the interval between the ice-point and the steam-point of a thermometer, =5/9 of a degree centigrade.
    • n unit Degree (Kelvin; K), = one degree on the absolute scale of temperatures the intervals of which are the same as those of the centigrade scale while the zero is at —273° C.
    • n unit Degree (Réaumur), = 1/80 of the Interval between the ice-point and the steam-point of a thermometer, = 5/4 of a degree centigrade, =9/4 of a degree Fahrenheit.
    • n unit Dyne, a unit of force; the force which, acting on a mass of one gram, produces an acceleration per second of one centimeter per second, =0.00007233 poundal. A dyne is equivalent to the following gravitational forces at sea-level in latitude 45°:=0.00101979 gram,=0.000–00224825 pound.
    • n unit Erg, the c. g. s. unit of energy; the work done by a force of one dyne acting through a distance of one centimeter, = 0.0000001 joule.
    • n unit Farad, a unit of electrical capacity, = 9 × 1011 c. g. s. units of the electrostatic system (approximately).
    • n unit Farad (international), the capacity represented by the ratio of one international coulomb divided by one international volt. The microfarad in common use is one millionth of this quantity.
    • n unit Fathom (British), =0.001 nautical mile, =6.080 feet, =1.8532 meters.
    • n unit Fathom (United States), =6.00 feet, = 1.8288 meters.
    • n unit Foot (British), =12 inches, = 30.4801 centimeters.
    • n unit Foot (cubic), =28,317.0 cubic centimeters, =7.48052 gallons (United States).
    • n unit Foot-candle, a unit of illumination; the illumination from a candle at a distance of one foot, =12.2 luxes (approximately).
    • n unit Foot-pound, a gravitational unit of work, =1.35573 joules, =0.323859 calory, = 0.000376591 watt-hour, = 0.000000–505051 horse-power hour.
    • n unit Furlong, =660 feet, =201.17 meters.
    • n unit Gallon (liquid; United States), =3,785.43 cubic centimeters, =231 cubic inches.
    • n unit Gallon (imperial), =4,545.9361 cubic centimeters,=277.410 cubic inches, =0.00594586 cubic yard.
    • n unit Gauss, a unit of magnetic induction or flux density, = 1 c. g. s. unit, = 1 maxwell or line of force per square centimeter, =6.45163 maxwells per square inch.
    • n unit Gilbert, a unit of magnetomotive force, = 1 c. g. s. unit, =10/4π = .7958 ampere-turn.
    • n unit Grade, a unit of angular measure, =0.01 quadrant, = 0.015708 radian.
    • n unit Grain,=0.0647989 gram.
    • n unit Gram, = 15.432356 grains, =0.0352740 oz. (avoir.), =0.0022046 pound (avoir.).
    • n unit Gram (taken as a unit of force at sea-level in latitude 45°), = 980.600 dynes, = 0.0709265 poundal.
    • n unit Gram-centimeter, a gravitational unit of work; the work required to lift one gram one centimeter against gravity, =980.60 ergs in lat. 45°.
    • n unit Gram-molecule, that weight of a substance in grams which equals numerically its molecular weight.
    • n unit Hand, a unit used in measuring the height at which horses stand, =4.0 inches.
    • n unit Hectare, = 10,000 square meters, =2.47104 acres.
    • n unit Hectoliter, = 100 liters, =26.4170 gallons (U. S.), =3.53145 cubic feet.
    • n unit Hefner, the unit of intensity of light commonly accepted as the primary standard in photometry (see hefner), =0.88 British standard candle, =0.89 … 1.026 bougies décimales (approximately).
    • n unit Hefner (spherical), a unit of flux of light; the total flux from a source of light of one hefner intensity, =12.5664 lumens.
    • n unit Henry, a practical unit of inductance; an inductance such that the induced electromotive force is one international volt, while the rate of variation of the inducing current is one international ampere per second, = 1 quadrant, = 1 secohm, = 1 × 109 c. g. s. units.
    • n unit Horse-power, =745.650 watts. =33,000 foot-pounds per minute, =42.4108 British thermal units per minute, = 10,687.3 calories per minute, = 1.01387 metric horse-power.
    • n unit Horse-power (metric), = 0.735448 kilowatt, = 0.986318 horse-power.
    • n unit Horse-power hour, = 2,684,340 joules, = 1,980,000 foot-pounds, =2,544.65 British thermal units, = 745.650 watt-hours, = 641,240 calories.
    • n unit Hundredweight (long), = 112 pounds (avoir.).
    • n unit Hundredweight (short), = 100 pounds (avoir.),=45.35924 kilograms.
    • n unit Inch, =.083333 foot, =2.540005 centimeters.
    • n unit Inch (circular), a unit of cross-section, =1,000,000 circular mils, = 0.785398 square inch, = 5.067090 square centimeters.
    • n unit Inch (miners), a unit of flow of water. = 1.5 cubic feet per minute. =0.000707925 cubic meter per second.
    • n unit Joule, a practical unit of energy, = 10,000,000 ergs, = 0.737612 foot-pound, =0.238882 calory.
    • n unit Kapp line, a practical unit of magnetic flux =6,000 maxwells.
    • n unit Kilo-calory (also called large calory), = 1,000 calories.
    • n unit Kilodyne, = 1,000 dynes.
    • n unit Kilogram, = 1,000 grams, =35.2740 ounces (avoir.), =2.20462 pounds (avoir.).
    • n unit Kilogram (taken as a unit of force at sea-level in latitude 45°), =980,600 dynes, =70,9265 poundals.
    • n unit Kilogram-meter, a gravitational unit of work, = 9.80596 joules, = 7.23300 foot-pounds, = 2.34247 calories, = 0.00272388 watt-hour.
    • n unit Kilometer, = 1,000 meters, =3,280.83 feet, =0.621370 mile.
    • n unit Kilowatt, = 1,000 watts, = 1.34111 horse-power, = 44,256.7 foot-pounds per minute, = 56.8776 British thermal units per minute.
    • n unit Kilowatt-hour, = 1,000 watt-hours, = 3,600,000 joules, = 3,412.66 British thermal units, = 859,975 calories, = 1.34111 horse-power hours.
    • n unit Kine, a unit of velocity, =one centimeter per second.
    • n unit Knot or nautical mile, =6,080.27 feet, = 1,853.25 meters,= 1′ of the earth's circumference.
    • n unit Light-year, a unit of length used in expressing the distance of fixed stars from the earth, = 9.467 × 1012 kilometers, =5.8825 × 1012 miles.
    • n unit Line of force (magnetic), a unit of flux, =1 maxwell or c. g s. unit.
    • n unit Link, a unit of length used in surveying, =7.920 inches, =20.117 centimeters.
    • n unit Liter, =1,000 cubic centimeters, =1.05668 quarts (United States), = 0.0013079 cubic yard.
    • n unit Lumen, a unit of flux of light; the flux from a source of one hefner intensity per unit of solid angle; the flux from one hefner which is comprised within a cone which subtends a surface of one square meter at a radius of one meter, =0.079577 of the total flux from a hefner.
    • n unit Lumen-hour, a unit of quantity of light (or more properly of luminous energy); one lumen of flux for one hour.
    • n unit Lux, a unit of illumination; the illumination from one hefner at a distance of one meter, =0.0818 foot-candle.
    • n unit Matthiesen's unit of electrical conductivity, = 592,768 mho-cubic centimeter units.
    • n unit Maxwell, a unit of magnetic flux, = 1 c. g. s. unit, = 1 line of force, = 1/4π of the flux from a unit pole.
    • n unit Megadyne, =1,000,000 dynes.
    • n unit Megamho, the reciprocal of a microhm.
    • n unit Megaohm. Same as megohm (below).
    • n unit Megavolt, = 1,000,000 volts.
    • n unit Megohm, a unit of electrical resistance, = 1,000,000 ohms.
    • n unit Meter, = 100 centimeters, =39.37000 inches, = 3.28083 feet.
    • n unit Meter (cubic), = 61,023.4 cubic inches. =264,170 gallons (United States), = 35.3145 cubic feet, = 1.30794 cubic yards.
    • n unit Meter-candle, a unit of illumination; the illumination from a candle at a distance of one meter,=1 lux (approximately), =0.0818 foot-candle.
    • n unit Meter-kilogram, a practical unit of torque; the torque exerted by a force corresponding to the weight of one kilogram acting at the end of an arm one meter in length.
    • n unit Mho, a practical unit of electrical conductance; for unvarying direct currents it is the reciprocal of the ohm, =1 × 10 c. g. s. units.
    • n unit Mho (in alternating currents), a practical unit of admittance. Admittance in mhos is effective amperes divided by effective volte.
    • n unit Mho (in alternating circuits), a unit of susceptance. Susceptance in mhos is wattless amperes divided by volts.
    • n unit Mho-cubic centimeter unit (Hering). See unit of electrical conductivity (below).
    • n unit Micro-ampere, =0.000001 ampere.
    • n unit Microdyne, a unit of force, =0.000001 dyne.
    • n unit Microfarad, the practical unit commonly used for the measure of electrical capacity, =9 × 105 c. g. s. units of the electrostatic system (approximately), = 0.000001 farad.
    • n unit Microhenry (of inductance), = 0.000001 henry, = 1,000 c. g. s. units.
    • n unit Microhm, a unit of electrical resistance, =0.000001 ohm, = 1,000 c. g. s. units.
    • n unit Micron (μ), = 0.001 millimeter, =10,000 Ångström units.
    • n unit Microvolt, =0.000001 volt, = 100 c. g. s. units.
    • n unit Mil, =0.001 inch, =.002540 centimeter.
    • n unit Mil (circular), a unit of cross-section, = 0.000001 circular inch, =0.00050671 square millimeter.
    • n unit Mile (nautical) or knot, =1.15155 statute miles,=6,080.27 feet, = 1,853.25 meters.
    • n unit Mile (statute), = 5,280 feet, =1,609.35 meters.
    • n unit Milliampere, =0.001 ampere.
    • n unit Milligram, =0.015432 grain.
    • n unit Millihenry (of inductance), = 0.001 henry.
    • n unit Millimeter, =0.1 centimeter, =0.039370 inch.
    • n unit Millimeter (circular), a unit of cross-section, = 1.55000 circular mils, = 0.785398 square millimeter.
    • n unit Millimicron (μμ),=0.001μ, =0.000001 millimeter.
    • n unit Millivolt, =0.001 volt.
    • n unit Mol, = 1 gram-molecule.
    • n unit Month (lunar), averages 29.53059 mean solar days.
    • n unit Month (synodic), an average lunar month.
    • n unit Oersted, a unit of reluctance or magnetic resistance, = 1 c. g. s. unit.
    • n unit Ohm, a unit of electrical resistance, = 1 × 109 c. g. s. units.
    • n unit Ohm (B. A., or British Association), =0.986699 ohm.
    • n unit Ohm (Board of Trade), = 1.01358 B. A. ohms.
    • n unit Ohm (international), a practical unit of resistance recommended by the International Congress at Chicago in 1893 and subsequently legalized by the United States Congress. It is the resistance at 0° C. of a column of pure mercury of uniform cross-section and 106.3 centimeters in length, weighing 14.4521 grams.
    • n unit Ohm (legal), =0.997178 ohm.
    • n unit Ohm (true), = 1 × 109 c. g. s. units.
    • n unit Ounce (avoir.), =28.3495 grams, =437.500 grains, =0.062500 pound (avoir.)
    • n unit Ounce (fluid; British), =28.41227 cubic centimeters, = 1.73381 cubic inches.
    • n unit Ounce (fluid; United States), =29.5737 cubic centimeters, =1.80469 cubic inches.
    • n unit Ounce (troy), =480 grains, =31.1035 grams.
    • n unit Pint (imperial), = 568.245 cubic centimeters, =34.6762 cubic inches, = 1.20091 United States pints (liquid).
    • n unit Pint (dry; United States), = 1.16365 liquid pints (United States), =0.968972 imperial pint, =550.614 cubic centimeters.
    • n unit Pint (liquid; United States), =473.179 cubic centimeters, =28.875 cubic inches, =0.859367 pint (dry; United States), =0.832702 imperial pint.
    • n unit Poucelet, a unit of power, =100 kilogram-meters per second, =0.9806 kilowatt, = 1.31509 horse-power.
    • n unit Pound (avoir.),=7,000 grains, =453.5924 grams.
    • n unit Pound (taken as a unit of force at sea-level in latitude 45°), =444,791 dynes,=32.1717 poundals.
    • n unit Pound (troy),=5,760 grains, =373.242 grams.
    • n unit Pound-foot, a practical unit of torque; the torque exerted by a force corresponding to the weight of one pound acting at the end of an arm one foot in length.
    • n unit Poundal, a unit of force; a force which, acting upon a mass of one pound, produces an acceleration per second of one foot per second, =13,825.5 dynes. The poundal corresponds to the force exerted by 0.031083 pound or 14.099 grams at sea-level in latitude 45°.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: The first skyscraper in the United States was built in Chicago.
    • n Unit ū′nit one: a single thing or person: the least whole number: anything taken as one: any known determinate quantity by constant application of which any other quantity is measured
    • adj Unit pertaining to Unitarians or their doctrine
    • v.t Unit to obtain the unitate of
    • ***

Quotations

  • Hermann Wey
    Hermann Wey
    “My work always tried to unite the true with the beautiful; but when I had to choose one or the other, I usually chose the beautiful.”
  • Karl Wilhelm Von Humboldt
    Karl%20Wilhelm%20Von%20Humboldt
    “True enjoyment comes from activity of the mind and exercise of the body; the two are ever united.”
  • Napoleon Bonaparte
    Napoleon%20Bonaparte
    “There are only two forces that unite men -- fear and interest.”
  • Bhagavad Gita
    Bhagavad Gita
    “Still your mind in me, still yourself in me, and without a doubt you shall be united with me, Lord of Love, dwelling in your heart.”
  • Ralph Bunche
    Ralph Bunche
    “The United Nations is our one great hope for a peaceful and free world.”
  • Homer
    Homer
    “Not vain the weakest, if their force unite.”

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Abbrev. from unity,

Usage

In literature:

What part of the United States was formerly a possession of Mexico, and how did it become a possession of the United States?
"Commercial Geography" by Jacques W. Redway
I am a United States officer, and I shall visit a United States fort whenever I think proper, without asking your permission.
"Reminiscences of Forts Sumter and Moultrie in 1860-'61" by Abner Doubleday
Secondly, because small, late swarms may be easily united.
"Mysteries of Bee-keeping Explained" by M. Quinby
If all tyrants unite against a free people, should not all free people unite against tyrants?
"Washington and the American Republic, Vol. 3." by Benson J. Lossing
Hill, commanding the right wing of his composite but united army, was already with him.
"The Political History of England - Vol XI" by George Brodrick
He was the first president of the United States, being elected in 1789, and again in 1793, declining a third term in 1797.
"Southern Literature From 1579-1895" by Louise Manly
Also, the tractor sharply reduced labor needs for the major crops of the United States.
"Agricultural Implements and Machines in the Collection of the National Museum of History and Technology" by John T. Schlebecker
The causes of the existence of these groups in the United States to-day.
"The Settlement of Wage Disputes" by Herbert Feis
All four of these requisites exist in the United States to-day, awaiting the master hand that shall unite them.
"The American Empire" by Scott Nearing
Sometimes a few parents unite to employ a teacher for their children.
"History of Education" by Levi Seeley
Vast sums were raised in our own country during the great war by such small units as Thrift Stamps.
"Scouting For Girls, Official Handbook of the Girl Scouts" by Girl Scouts
With a united people, it worked; but one can not have a World War always to unite the people.
"All About Coffee" by William H. Ukers
Unifactum means united or made into one, referring to the stems united in one base root or stem.
"The Mushroom, Edible and Otherwise" by M. E. Hard
But who were to unite to form that majority, and what was to be their platform?
"The Day of Sir Wilfrid Laurier" by Oscar D. Skelton
Cooke, M. C. Myxomycetes of the United States.
"The North American Slime-Moulds" by Thomas H. (Thomas Huston) MacBride
The final unit of the increasing agent produces less than did the earlier units in the series.
"Essentials of Economic Theory" by John Bates Clark
Every nation on earth, whether friends or enemies, will unite in despising you.
"The Writings Of Thomas Paine, Complete" by Thomas Paine
Yes, my dear child, we three, a loving trio, are still united just as of yore.
"Solaris Farm" by Milan C. Edson
The United States had none.
"Stories of Our Naval Heroes" by Various
He had been elected President of the United States, and he must do all he could to keep these states united.
"The Story of Our Country"
***

In poetry:

But when once from hence we fly,
More and more approaching nigh
Unto young eternity,
Uniting
"The White Island:or Place Of The Blest" by Robert Herrick
The desert halls uplighting,
While falling shadows glance,
Like courtly crowds uniting
For the banquet or the dance;
"Moonrise" by Ernest Jones
In thee, let joy with duty join,
And strength unite with love,
The eagle's pinions folding round
The warm heart of the dove!
"On Receiving An Eagle's Quill From Lake Superior" by John Greenleaf Whittier
And shall our love, so far beyond
That low and dying appetite,
And which so chaste desires unite,
Not hold in an eternal bond?
"An Ode Upon a Question Moved, Whether Love Should Continue Forever" by Lord Edward Herbert of Cherbury
But there are flowers that bloom enshrin'd
In hearts by love united,
Unscathed by the autumn wind,
By autumn frost unblighted.
"Autumn" by William James Jones
She saw him die; her latest sigh
Join'd in a kiss his parting breath,
The gentlest pair that Britain bare,
United are in death.
"Thomas the Rhymer" by Sir Walter Scott

In news:

Update the standards units per the ASTM Units Project directive Keywords.
United and Continental pilots are seen outside the United Airlines Building at 77 W Wacker Dr during a demonstration in May over their union contract.
The United Nations Secretariat Building at the United Nations Headquarters in New York City.
The 135-pint-per-day unit offers the same features as the 90-pint unit .
Similar broadcast units on the market route their feeds through a desktop or laptop PC to connect to the internet--a solution that's unwieldy and much more expensive than Livestream's all-in-one $495 unit.
Two-thirds of the goods that move to and from the United States cross the Panama Canal , and the United States is the canal 's leading customer.
Has it been too long since you've last seen a payment for a particular unit or, in many cases, a group of units in your condo or HOA.
The 16th President of the United States was born February 12, 1809 REUTERS/Joshua Roberts (UNITED STATES).
The United States and Mexico agreed Tuesday to rewrite rules on sharing water from the Colorado River , capping a five-year effort to create a united front against future droughts.
SAN DIEGO (AP) — The United States and Mexico are rewriting rules on how to share water from the Colorado River , capping a five-year effort to form a united front against future drought in their western states.
United Arab Emirates, on Saturday pressed the Syrian opposition to form a united leadership to pursue its war against.
One of the unit owners smokes in his unit.
Inspiration for sustainable living from both the United States and the United Kingdom, with permaculture design ideas for your garden , home and lifestyle.
From the very start of the United States, a great divide was developed over whether or not a national bank should or should not be…a Bank of the United States, if you will.
As many of you know, KBTX partnered with United Way Wednesday for "United We Help," a fundraiser for residents in our area affected by Hurricane Ike.
***

In science:

All algebras are unital K -algebras and all morphisms preserve units.
Number Operator Algebras
Unite() unites two amplitudes which differ only by a photon, Z or Higgs boson propagator.
AMEGIC++ 1.0, A Matrix Element Generator In C++
Remark 5.14 One can in fact prove that C is modular iff dim C 6= 0 and the center Z2 (C ) consists only of the direct multiples of the unit or, equivalently, iff all simple ob jects of Z2 (C ) are isomorphic to the unit ob ject.
From Subfactors to Categories and Topology II. The quantum double of tensor categories and subfactors
Proof: (i). B is unital being the inductive limit of a sequence of unital C ∗ -algebras with unital connecting maps.
A simple C*-algebra with a finite and an infinite projection
Example 3.13 [Unital algebra] Let A be a unital algebra. A carries a non trivial L-bialgebra called the flower graph with coproducts δ(a) = a ⊗ 1 and ˜δ = 1 ⊗ a.
Coassociativity breaking and oriented graphs
Here is an example constructed from an associative unital algebra A, with unit I and the curvature ω of an Ito map ρ.
Coassociativity breaking and oriented graphs
Here ˆz is the unit vector along the beam direction, and ˆv⊥ coincides with the radial unit vector, ˆv⊥ = (cos φs , sin φs ).
Elliptic Flow from a Transversally Thermalized Fireball
The particle moves at each step either one unit to the left with probability p or one unit to the right with probability q = 1 − p.
Limit theorems and absorption problems for quantum random walks in one dimension
This means that the unit vector bw is to be identified with the unit vector ba.
Generalized Spherical Harmonics
For example, the perturbation starts at r = 1, which in real units I take at R = 60 kpc, and I consider the region around r ≃ 0.25, or in real units R ≃ 10 − 20 kpc.
Problems in suppressing cooling flows in clusters of galaxies by global heat conduction
A is the amplitude, p is the unit polarization vector (|p| = 1), α is the wave vector (α = αn, |n| = 1, n is the unit wave normal vector).
Fundamental Solutions in Plane Problem for Anisotropic Elastic Medium Under Moving Oscillating Source
Using a system of units in which  = 1 a quantum degree of freedom corresponds roughly to a unit volume in phase space.
Random Matrices and the Anderson Model
The goal of this section is to show that given a real C*-algebra A, we can obtain a unital algebra with the same united K -theory.
The Range of United K-Theory
Then there is a real separable simple purely infinite C*-algebra OR E and a unital inclusion A ֒→ OR E which induces an isomorphism on united K -theory.
The Range of United K-Theory
Lemma (Theorem 4.4 in [Ln3]) Let B be a unital C ∗ -algebra and let A be a unital C ∗ -algebra in A which is a unital C ∗ -subalgebra of B .
Simple nuclear $C^*$-algebras of tracial topological rank one
***