trochanter

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • n trochanter one of the bony prominences developed near the upper extremity of the femur to which muscles are attached
    • ***
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • Trochanter (Anat) One of two processes near the head of the femur, the outer being called the great trochanter, and the inner the small trochanter.
    • Trochanter (Zoöl) The third joint of the leg of an insect, or the second when the trochantine is united with the coxa.
    • ***
Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n trochanter In anatomy and zoology, a tuberosity, protuberance, or apophysis of the upper part of the femur or thigh-bone, for the insertion of various muscles which flex, extend, or rotate the limb. There may be one (elephant), two (usually), or three (horse) such processes; in man there are two, called the greater and the lesser trochanter, the former for the gluteal muscles and those collectively called rotators, the latter for the psoas and iliacus. In birds the great trochanter enters into the construction of the hip-joint, as a shoulder of the femur which abuts against the ilium. Trochanters commonly have an independent center of ossification, and are therefore of the nature of epiphyses. See cuts under epiphysis and femur.
    • n trochanter In entomology, the second joint of an insect's leg, succeeding the coxa. The trochanter is sometimes two-jointed, in which case the proximal one of its two joints takes the name of trochantin, the other being the trochanter proper. See cut under coxa.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • n Trochanter trō-kan′tėr a rough eminence on the outer aspect of the upper part of the thigh-bone for the insertion of various muscles which rotate the thigh outwards: the second joint of an insect's leg
    • ***

Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
NL., fr. Gr.
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
Gr.,—trechein, to run.

Usage

In literature:

Jenner speaks of a breast on the outer side of the thigh four inches below the great trochanter.
"Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine" by George M. Gould
The internal trochanter was also fractured in four small pieces.
"Lameness of the Horse" by John Victor Lacroix
The next little one we will mark II, and that we will call the trochanter.
"The Insect Folk" by Margaret Warner Morley
Circular entry in left buttock behind trochanter.
"Surgical Experiences in South Africa, 1899-1900" by George Henry Makins
Ditrocha: Hymenoptera; that series having the trochanter two-jointed.
"Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology" by John. B. Smith
Shortening on one side indicates an upward displacement of the trochanter, lengthening a downward displacement.
"Manual of Surgery Volume Second: Extremities--Head--Neck. Sixth Edition." by Alexander Miles
Femur without third trochanter.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 2, Slice 6" by Various
A third trochanter on the femur.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 10" by Various
The first of these is called the 'coxa', and is succeeded by a short joint called the 'trochanter'.
"The New Gresham Encyclopedia" by Various
The femur is longer than the bones of the leg; the great trochanter does not reach the level of the head of the femur.
"Artistic Anatomy of Animals" by Édouard Cuyer
Pain in right great trochanter.
"New, Old, and Forgotten Remedies: Papers by Many Writers" by Various
The femur has no third trochanter.
"The Cambridge Natural History, Vol X., Mammalia" by Frank Evers Beddard
The femur has, in most species, a prominent ridge below the greater trochanter presenting the characters of a third trochanter.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 14, Slice 6" by Various
Femur: length 9.5 inches; width across head and trochanter 2.75 inches, across distal end 2.5 inches.
"Trees. A Woodland Notebook" by Herbert Maxwell
Femur: length 9.5 inches; width across head and trochanter 2.75 inches, across distal end 2.5 inches.
"Extinct Birds" by Walter Rothschild
The trochanter is simple in some genera and divided in others.
"Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 14, Slice 2" by Various
***