tipple

Definitions

  • WordNet 3.6
    • v tipple drink moderately but regularly "We tippled the cognac"
    • n tipple a serving of drink (usually alcoholic) drawn from a keg "they served beer on draft"
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Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
    • n Tipple An apparatus by which loaded cars are emptied by tipping; also, the place where such tipping is done.
    • n Tipple Liquor taken in tippling; drink. "Pulque, the national tipple of Mexico."
    • v. i Tipple To drink spirituous or strong liquors habitually; to indulge in the frequent and improper used of spirituous liquors; especially, to drink frequently in small quantities, but without absolute drunkeness. "Few of those who were summoned left their homes, and those few generally found it more agreeable to tipple in alehouses than to pace the streets."
    • Tipple To drink, as strong liquors, frequently or in excess. "Himself, for saving charges,
      A peeled, sliced onions eats, and tipples verjuice."
    • Tipple To put up in bundles in order to dry, as hay.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
    • n tipple In haymaking, a bundle of hay collected from the swath, and formed into a conical shape. This is tied near the top so as to make it taper to a point, and set upon its base to dry.
    • tipple To turn over, as in tumbling; tumble.
    • n tipple The place where cars are tipped, or have their contents dumped; a dump; a cradle-dump. Also tip.
    • tipple To drink strong drink often in small quantities. As commonly used, the word implies reprehensible indulgence in frequent or habitual drinking, short of the limit of positive drunkenness.
    • tipple To imbibe slowly and repeatedly; drink by sips or in small quantities, as liquor; use in drinking.
    • tipple To affect by tippling, or frequent drinking; bring under the influence of strong drink; make boozy or drunk.
    • n tipple Liquor taken in tippling; stimulating drink: sometimes used figuratively.
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Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
    • v.i Tipple tip′l to drink in small quantities: to drink strong liquors often or habitually
    • v.t Tipple to drink, as strong liquors, to excess
    • n Tipple liquor tippled
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
From tip, a small end, or a word akin to it; cf. Norw. tipla, to tipple, to drip, Prov. E. tip, tiff, tift, a draught of liquor, dial. G. zipfeln, to eat and drink in small parts. See Tip a point, and cf. Tipsy

Usage

In literature:

On rising he tippled again, and went on tippling till his fish were put on board the steamer.
"The Lively Poll" by R.M. Ballantyne
In fact, these two absolutely took to tippling together on this medicine.
"Freaks on the Fells" by R.M. Ballantyne
Hast done feeding and tippling yet, morio?
"Under the Rose" by Frederic Stewart Isham
Mars ne'er received such tipple from the hands of Ganymede.
"Destruction and Reconstruction:" by Richard Taylor
I hope Geoff has some better tipple than that to cheer him in the High Valley.
"In the High Valley" by Susan Coolidge
The beer-drinking German is often similarly affected as regards his special tipple.
"Aztec Land" by Maturin M. Ballou
Nothing against the tipple.
"The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 7 (of 25)" by Robert Louis Stevenson
In old days he drank on credit: now the good fellows tipple at his expense.
"The English Novel in the Time of Shakespeare" by J. J. Jusserand
Why, we cannot even choose our own tipple on such occasions.
"A Little Garrison" by Fritz von der Kyrburg
All appeared to enjoy the tippling vastly more than Hank himself.
"Little Wolf" by M. A. Cornelius
The footman lays behind to tipple ale and wine, And goes gallop, a gallop, a gallop, to make up his time.
"The Nursery Rhymes of England" by Various
Why did you give the fellow such insinuating tipple as that old '31 wine?
"One Of Them" by Charles James Lever
Tippling-houses might then be shut up with justice and propriety.
"Cottage Economy" by William Cobbett
This new-born offspring of his merely served him as a peg whereon to hang the responsibility for his tipple.
"A Top-Floor Idyl" by George van Schaick
Had you tippled it, or spent it foolishly, you would have regretted parting with it.
"Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland" by Various
So tipple some more of it.
"The Undying Past" by Hermann Sudermann
Those at home for whom brave men are suffering and dying should be done with tippling and trifling.
"With our Fighting Men" by William E. Sellers
Yes, but that father of yours isn't so squeamish when he comes on Sundays and tipples till we have to put him out dead-drunk.
"The Betrothal" by Maurice Maeterlinck
Such birds were then called Tipplers ("tipple" having in some English dialects the meaning of "tumble").
"Our Domestic Birds" by John H. Robinson
There are still further checks and affidavits required, in the hope of making drug store tippling impossible.
"Sober by Act of Parliament" by Fred A. McKenzie
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In poetry:

LA GUERRE would declare, "With the blood of a foe
No tipple is worthy to clink."
Poor fellow! he hadn't, though sixty or so,
Yet tasted his favourite drink!
"The Two Majors" by William Schwenck Gilbert
Awake! I say, awake, good people!
And be for once alive and gay;
Come, let's be merry; stir the tipple;
How can you sleep?
Whilst I do play? How can you sleep? &c.
"Ode: To be performed" by William Shenstone
I said not this, because he loves
Through the long day to swear and tipple;
But for the poor dear sake of one
To whom a foul deed he had done,
A friendless man, a travelling cripple!
"Andrew Jones" by William Wordsworth
Oh some are fond of red wine, and some are fond of white,
And some are all for dancing by the pale moonlight:
But rum alone’s the tipple, and the heart’s delight
Of the old bold mate of Henry Morgan.
"Captain Stratton’s Fancy" by John Masefield
In Indolence, the Clergy live,
The venal Judges bribes receive,
The Gentry tipple in each paltry inn;
The Farmer, but as yesterday
Unus'd to drink, now topes away,
And smokes his tube, as if it were no sin.
"To The Sons Of Brutus" by Rees Prichard
But owing, I'm much disposed to fear,
To his terrible taste for tippling,
That highly respectable Gondolier
Could never declare with a mind sincere
Which of the two was his offspring dear,
And which the Royal stripling!
"The Highly Respectable Gondolier" by William Schwenck Gilbert

In news:

In science's diligent search for origins of the universe, archeologists have made a discovery that puts a frothy head on the origins of human tippling.
Contraband Cocktails: Try Your Hand at Prohibition Era Tipples.
To celebrate the DVD release of HBO's hit Prohibition Era crime drama, "Boardwalk Empire," Marian Beke - head bartender at London's 'speakeasy' style haunt Nightjar - has created a selection of 1920s tipples.
On Oct 8, real Italians took time to salute Christopher Columbus' landmark arrival to the New World with Molinari Sambuca Extra, a real Italian-American tipple.
Uncover Tahitian tipples on this cocktail-oriented trip.
Midsummer Night's Tipple : Gewürztraminer to Riesling.
Save the coal tipple .
Whether you want a tiny tipple or a serious cocktail, bartenders are mixing up drinks with an alcohol content just for you.
Three innovative tipples with a salty edge you can make at home.
Martin Miller's Gin Set out to Re- invent the British Tipple.
Midsummer Night's Tipple: Gewürztraminer to Riesling.
Midsummer Night 's Tipple: Gewürztraminer to Riesling.
No sweet treat harmonizes with crisp holiday weather better than apple pie — except frothy, tippling, chilled apple- pie -in-a-glass.
Martin Miller's Gin Set out to Re-invent the British Tipple.
Coal storage area and railroad tipple, Colstrip, Montana, 1984.
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In science:

Without fear of confusion we will use in the integral the notation −∞ and ∞ as the limits of the tipple integral in what follows.
Pseudolocalized Three-dimensional Solitary Waves as Quasi-Particles
Lp norms or group norms then as we will see in the next section, mirror descent update step has tipple complexity of order d and so since mirror descent is a single pass algorithm that goes over samples one by one, its time complexity when run once over the sample is again of order nd.
Learning From An Optimization Viewpoint
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