throat

Definitions

  • BROWN PELICANS IN FLORIDA The Pelicans nest in colonies, and the young feed from the parents' throats. Range: Gulf coast of U. S. and southward. Habitat Group in The American Museum of Natural History
    BROWN PELICANS IN FLORIDA The Pelicans nest in colonies, and the young feed from the parents' throats. Range: Gulf coast of U. S. and southward. Habitat Group in The American Museum of Natural History
  • WordNet 3.6
    • n throat the part of an animal's body that corresponds to a person's throat
    • n throat a passage resembling a throat in shape or function; "the throat of the vase","the throat of a chimney"
    • n throat an opening in the vamp of a shoe at the instep
    • n throat the passage to the stomach and lungs; in the front part of the neck below the chin and above the collarbone
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Additional illustrations & photos:

Nest and eggs of ruby-throat humming-bird Nest and eggs of ruby-throat humming-bird
Red-throated Diver Red-throated Diver
WHITE-THROATED SPARROW WHITE-THROATED SPARROW
RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD
Section of Mouth and Throat Section of Mouth and Throat

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Minnows have teeth located on a bone in their throat
    • Throat A contracted portion of a vessel, or of a passage way; as, the throat of a pitcher or vase.
    • Throat (Anat) Hence, the passage through it to the stomach and lungs; the pharynx; -- sometimes restricted to the fauces.
    • Throat (Naut) That end of a gaff which is next the mast.
    • Throat (Naut) The angle where the arm of an anchor is joined to the shank.
    • Throat (Shipbuilding) The inside of a timber knee.
    • Throat (Bot) The orifice of a tubular organ; the outer end of the tube of a monopetalous corolla; the faux, or fauces.
    • Throat (Arch) The part of a chimney between the gathering, or portion of the funnel which contracts in ascending, and the flue.
    • Throat (Anat) The part of the neck in front of, or ventral to, the vertebral column.
    • Throat (Naut) The upper fore corner of a boom-and-gaff sail, or of a staysail.
    • Throat To mow, as beans, in a direction against their bending.
    • Throat To utter in the throat; to mutter; as, to throat threats.
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Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  • Interesting fact: Minnows have teeth in their throat.
    • n throat Any passage from large to small cross-section, as in a pipe which leads off from a main, where in the neck of the joint the area is enlarged to give easy flow and smooth curves.
    • n throat The top or head opening of a shaft or blast-furnace through which the charges of ore fuel and flux are dumped by gravity.
    • n throat The curve where the flange of railway car-wheels joins the straight cylindrical or conical part of the tread. This throat part bears against the upper corner of the head of the rail
    • n throat In geology, the upper portion of a volcanic conduit, which is adjacent to the crater.
    • n throat The front part of the mold-board of a plow.
    • n throat The front of the neck below the chin and above the collar-bone; technically, the jugular region, jugulum, or guttur.
    • n throat The passage from the mouth to the stomach or to the lungs. The swallow or gullet; technically, the fauces, pharynx, and esophagus.
    • n throat The air-passage in the throat; the windpipe; technically, the larynx and trachea: as, to form musical notes in the throat.
    • n throat Something resembling or analogous to the human throat. In entomology, the gula, or posterior part of the lower side of the head, behind the mentum.
    • n throat Nautical: The central part of the hollow of a breast-hook or knee.
    • n throat The inner end of a gaff, where it widens and hollows in to fit the mast. See cut under gaff.
    • n throat The inner part of the arms of an anchor, where they join the shank.
    • n throat The upper front corner of a four-sided fore-and-aft sail.
    • n throat In ship-building, the middle part of a floor-timber.
    • n throat In building, the part of a chimney, usually contracted, between the fireplace proper and the gathering.
    • n throat The narrowed entrance to the neck of a puddling-furnace, where the area of flue-passage is regulated. See cut under puddling-furnace.
    • n throat In plate glass manufacturing, the front door of the annealing-arch.
    • n throat The entranceway in a threshing-machine, where the grain in the straw-passes from the feed-board to the cylinder.
    • n throat The opening in a plane-stock through which the shavings pass upward.
    • n throat That part of the spoke of a wheel which lies just beyond the swell at the junction of the hub.
    • n throat In fortification, same as gorge; also, the smaller or inside opening of an embrasure (which see).
    • n throat In angling, a straitened body of water flowing with a smooth current through a narrow place, as between rocks in a river.
    • throat To utter in a guttural tone; mutter.
    • throat To channel or groove.
    • ***
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
  • Interesting fact: Pope Adrian VI choked to death after a fly got stuck in his throat as he was taking a drink from a fountain
    • n Throat thrōt the forepart of the neck, in which are the gullet and windpipe: an entrance: a narrow part of anything:
    • n Throat thrōt (naut.) the widened and hollowed end of a gaff next the mast—opp. to Peak, the outer end
    • ***

Quotations

  • John Louis O'Sullivan
    John Louis O'Sullivan
    “A torchlight procession marching down your throat.”
  • French Proverb
    French Proverb
    “Save a thief from the gallows and he will cut your throat.”
  • Robert Burns
    Robert%20Burns
    “Critics! Those cut-throat bandits in the paths of fame.”
  • Source Unknown
    Source Unknown
    “Having a sharp tongue will cut your throat”
  • Mike Tyson
    Mike Tyson
    “You can't stay married in a situation where you are afraid to go to sleep in case your wife might cut your throat.”
  • Bible
    Bible
    “Put a knife to thy throat, if you're a man given to appetite.”

Idioms

At each other's throats - If people are at each other's throats, they are fighting, arguing or competing ruthlessly.
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Frog in my throat - If you have a frog in your throat, you can't speak or you are losing your voice because you have a problem with your throat.
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Jump down someone's throat - If you jump down someone's throat, you criticise or chastise them severely.
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Etymology

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
OE. throte, AS. þrote, þrotu,; akin to OHG. drozza, G. drossel,; cf. OFries. & D. stort,. Cf. Throttle
Chambers's Twentieth Century Dictionary
A.S. throte; Dut. strot, Ger. drossel, the throat.

Usage

In literature:

She turned her face toward him, and the moonlight fell full on the warm whiteness of her throat.
"Nicanor - Teller of Tales" by C. Bryson Taylor
Her throat shivered as she breathed.
"Erik Dorn" by Ben Hecht
He cleared his throat.
"Pagan Passions" by Gordon Randall Garrett
Someone cleared his throat.
"The Best Made Plans" by Everett B. Cole
My throat and tongue felt shrivelled and parched.
"The Scalp Hunters" by Mayne Reid
Some diseases of the mouth or throat make it difficult for the horse to chew or swallow his feed.
"Special Report on Diseases of the Horse" by United States Department of Agriculture
Chin and throat yellow, with dark spots on throat.
"Birds of the Indian Hills" by Douglas Dewar
Rankin threw back his head, showing a triangle of very white throat above his loose collar, and laughed aloud.
"The Squirrel-Cage" by Dorothy Canfield
Oh, what throats and lungs they had!
"A Little Girl in Old New York" by Amanda Millie Douglas
She laid hold of her husband's hands and clasped them about her throat.
"The History of Sir Richard Calmady" by Lucas Malet
I think, if things are to go on as they ought to, it will be better to cut the throat of James Finlay.
"The Northern Iron" by George A. Birmingham
When he had shaken himself together and had swallowed the lump in his throat, he asked a passing workman for Mr. Freet, the Project Engineer.
"Still Jim" by Honoré Willsie Morrow
The throat and ear-coverts are black, and a white band of a crescent shape surrounds the throat.
"The Western World" by W.H.G. Kingston
Then he became aware of the trembling body of the cat beside him and a soft laughter rose in his throat.
"The Monster" by S. M. Tenneshaw
Something was choking in his throat.
"Hunters Out of Space" by Joseph Everidge Kelleam
Fear tightened Daoud's throat.
"The Saracen: Land of the Infidel" by Robert Shea
Already the feather was gone from his hat, the lace from his throat.
"The Road to Frontenac" by Samuel Merwin
The next moment his knife was drawn with practised skill across the beast's throat.
"The Backwoodsmen" by Charles G. D. Roberts
Scale and open it as near the throat as possible, and then put in the following stuffing.
"The Cook and Housekeeper's Complete and Universal Dictionary; Including a System of Modern Cookery, in all Its Various Branches," by Mary Eaton
Wilson managed to pour a spoonful of brandy down his throat and to rebandage the wound which had begun to bleed again.
"The Web of the Golden Spider" by Frederick Orin Bartlett
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In poetry:

It clutched my throat, I coughed;
Nothing was in my head
Except two heavy eyes
Like balls of burning lead.
"The Fog" by William H Davies
From dimly moonlit places
They thrust long throats of white,
And lovely lifted faces
Of fragrant snow and light.
"The Message Of The Lilies" by Madison Julius Cawein
This is the song of the Yellow-throat,
Fluttering gaily beside you;
Hear how each voluble note
Offers to guide you:
"The Angler’s Reveille" by Henry Van Dyke
BY the pulse that beats in my throat
By my heart like a bird
I know who passed through the dusk
Though he spoke no word!
"First Love" by Isabel Ecclestone Mackay
Scorning to wait for tuneful May
When every throat can sing,
Thou floutest Winter with thy lay,
And art thyself the Spring.
"A March Minstrel" by Alfred Austin
And yet, and yet I hear
No strains of pious cheer,
No children singing round the Yule—log fire;
No carol's sacred notes,
Warbled by infant throats,
On brooding mother's lap, or knee of pleasèd sire.
"Christmas,1870" by Alfred Austin

In news:

Books / Media What made Deep Throat cough up .
'The Dagger at the Throat of the Creaky Old Regimes'.
Nicki Minaj and Mariah Carey are already at each others throats.
Lionel Richie on Surviving the Cut-Throat Music Business.
'Survivor: South Pacific' recap: Episode 9, 'Cut Throat'.
In August 1989, Daniel Rakowitz, 28, a self-styled marijuana guru living in the East Village, killed his girlfriend, 26-year-old Monika Beerle, by striking her in the throat.
Teen's Throat Slashed by Drinking Glass .
No, it's not Boogie Nights, 54 or Inside Deep Throat, but it could be.
Deep Throat's Daughter, The Kindred Free Spirit .
Forcing slavery down the throat of a freesoiler.
And what's that funny tingling in his throat.
Yauch said in July 2009 that he first noticed a lump in his throat "like you have swollen glands ".
Throat Surgery a success for Keith Urban.
This superb sound that issues from her throat.
The public isn't interested in plans that are rammed down their throats.
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In science:

Specifically, recall that a non-degenerate Kerr black hole has two asymptotically flat external regions and two outer Killing horizons, intersecting in a bifurcation surface or wormhole throat [21, 22].
Kerr black holes in horizon-generating form
However, the region where x1 → −∞, the coupling constant will diverge and it is analogous to infinite throat in the interior of certain magnetically charged black hole.
Information Loss Paradox Tested on Chiral Fermion Coupled to a Background Dilatonic Field
Well into the throat region, the metric is approximated by the flat two dimensional Minkosky space times the round metric on the two sphere with radius Q and equation (2) results.
Information Loss Paradox Tested on Chiral Fermion Coupled to a Background Dilatonic Field
The dilaton field Φ indeed increases linearly with the proper distance into the throat.
Information Loss Paradox Tested on Chiral Fermion Coupled to a Background Dilatonic Field
CY compactification with flux and warped throats in the geometry.
String Theory: Progress and Problems
Furthermore, as discussed in , the KS solution can be used to model highly warped throat regions inside proper flux compactifications.
D-brane networks in flux vacua, generalized cycles and calibrations
The radial coordinate has a range that increases from a minimum value at r0 , corresponding to the wormhole throat, to ∞.
General class of wormhole geometries in conformal Weyl gravity
Note that in this simple case, one already obtains a solution that deviates from the general relativistic counterpart, in that the radial pressure is positive at the throat.
General class of wormhole geometries in conformal Weyl gravity
The energy density is negative, the radial pressure positive; and the NEC is satisfied at the throat neighborhood.
General class of wormhole geometries in conformal Weyl gravity
In particular, at the throat the NEC is satisfied in the range of 0.6 ≤ γ < 1.
General class of wormhole geometries in conformal Weyl gravity
The NEC is satisfied at the throat in the range of 0.6 ≤ γ < 1.
General class of wormhole geometries in conformal Weyl gravity
Note that the radial pressure is zero at the throat, and then remains negative throughout the coordinate range.
General class of wormhole geometries in conformal Weyl gravity
The energy density and the NEC are negative in the throat neighborhood.
General class of wormhole geometries in conformal Weyl gravity
The radial pressure is zero at the throat; the energy density is negative and the NEC is violated in the throat’s neighborhood.
General class of wormhole geometries in conformal Weyl gravity
This choice is qualitatively analogous to the previous case, except that the radial pressure is negative at the throat.
General class of wormhole geometries in conformal Weyl gravity
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